10 MOST Common Birds Found in Dallas, TX (2024)

What kinds of birds can you find in Dallas, TX?

common birds in dallas

Despite being a large city, I think you would be surprised at the number of species that you can find in downtown Dallas and the surrounding areas. Many types of birds can adapt to the presence of humans, even building nests and raising their babies in close proximity. In addition, there are other parks and other green spaces that offer hiding spaces for shyer birds.

Below, you will learn the TEN most common birds that are found around Dallas!


#1. Mallard

  • Anas platyrhynchos

Common United States ducks

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Males have a bright green head, thin white collar, dark reddish-brown chest, yellow bill, and a black butt with a white-tipped tail.
  • Females are mottled brown with orange and brown bills.
  • Both sexes have purple-blue secondary feathers on their wing, which is most visible when they are standing or flying.

My guess is that almost everyone is familiar with the Mallard. These ducks are definitely one of the most recognizable birds in Dallas!

Mallard Range Map

mallard duck range map Mallards are extremely comfortable around people, which is why these adaptable ducks are so widespread. They are found in virtually any wetland habitat, no matter where it’s located. We even find Mallards in our swimming pool every summer and have to chase them away so they don’t make a mess on our deck! 🙂

Mallards readily accept artificial structures built for them by humans. If you have a nice pond or a marsh, feel free to put up a homemade nesting area to enjoy some adorable ducklings walking around your property!  Just make sure you put up predator guards so predators can’t get to the eggs. When you think of a duck quacking, it is almost inevitably a female Mallard. If there is a better duck sound, we haven’t heard it! Interestingly, males do not quack like females but instead make a raspy call.


#2. Northern Cardinal

  • Cardinalis cardinalis

northern cardinal Identifying Characteristics:

  • Males are a stunning red with a black mask and throat.
  • Females are pale orangish-brown with red on their crest, wings, and tail.
  • Both sexes have a crest on their head and a short, thick bill that is perfect for cracking seeds.

Northern Cardinal Range Map

northern cardinal range map Without a doubt, the Northern Cardinal is one of the most popular birds in Dallas. They are not only beautifully colored, but they are incredibly common at backyard feeding stations!

In this video, you can see both male and female cardinals. If you look closely you can even see a juvenile! https://youtu.be/K4_a_u5gOBI

Here are my three favorite ways to attract cardinals to my backyard:

  • Supply their favorite foods, which include sunflower seeds, safflower seeds, corn, and peanuts.
  • Use bird feeders that are easy for them to use, such as trays and hoppers.
  • Keep a fresh supply of water available in a birdbath.

And with a little practice, it’s easy to identify Northern Cardinals by their songs and sounds. Interestingly, unlike most other songbirds in Dallas, even females sing

  • The most common song you will probably hear is a series of clear whistled melodies that sound like the bird is saying “birdie-birdie-birdie” or “cheer-cheer-cheer.” (Listen below!)


#3. Great Egret

great egret Identifying Characteristics:

  • Large, white bird with long, black legs.
  • S-curved neck and a daggerlike yellow bill. Look for a greenish area between their eyes and the base of the bill.
  • While they fly, their neck is tucked in, and their long legs trail behind.

Appearance-wise, Great Egrets are the most stunning heron found in Dallas. These birds especially put on a show during breeding season when they grow long feathery plumes, called aigrettes, which are held up during courtship displays.

Great Egret Range Map

great egret range map In fact, these aigrettes are so beautiful, Great Egrets were almost hunted to extinction in the 19th century because these feathers made such nice decorations on ladies’ hats. The National Audubon Society was actually formed in response to help protect these birds from being slaughtered. To this day, the Great Egret serves as the symbol for the organization. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WVdw7mpTUOI This species eats almost anything that may be in the water. The list includes reptiles, birds, amphibians, small mammals, and countless invertebrates. Great Egrets don’t get any awards for their beautiful songs. Listen for a loud sound that is best described as a croak (“kraak).” When surprised, you may hear a fast “cuk-cuk-cuk” alarm call. LISTEN BELOW!


#4. Northern Mockingbird

  • Mimus polyglottos

northern mockingbird Identifying Characteristics:

  • Medium-sized grey songbird with a LONG, slender tail.
  • Distinctive white wing patches that are visible when in flight.

These birds are NOT easy to miss in Dallas!

First, Northern Mockingbirds LOVE to sing, and they almost never stop. Sometimes they will even sing through the entire night. If this happens to you, it’s advised to keep your windows closed if you want to get any sleep. 🙂 In addition, Northern Mockingbirds have bold personalities. For example, it’s common for them to harass other birds by flying slowly around them and then approaching with their wings up, showing off their white wing patches.

Northern Mockingbird Range Map

northern mockingbird range map These grey birds are common in backyards, but they rarely eat from bird feeders. Nonetheless, I have heard from many people complaining that mockingbirds are scaring away the other birds from their feeding station, even though mockingbirds don’t even eat from feeders themselves!


#5. Great-tailed Grackle

  • Quiscalus mexicanus

Identifying Characteristics:

  • These blackbirds are fairly large, slender, and have long legs,
  • Males are iridescent and completely black. Look for their bright yellow eyes and long V-shaped tail.
  • Females are about half the size of males. Their upperparts are dark brown, while below, they feature paler brown plumage.

Great-tailed Grackles are brash birds in Dallas that are often found in large flocks. It’s common to see them living near people, such as at parks, farms, landfills, or neighborhood backyards. Naturally, they live in open forests, marshes, and chaparral. Their range has spread over the past century because of their fondness for agricultural areas and urban areas. In fact, they are one of the fastest-expanding species in North America!

Great-tailed Grackle Range Map

Interestingly, it’s common for “sex-biased” populations of Great-tailed Grackles to occur where female birds greatly outnumber males. This happens for two reasons.

  • #1. Females have a higher survival rate in the nest since they are smaller and require less food.
  • #2. On average, females live longer than males.

Because of their wide array of vocalizations, it’s hard to describe the sounds that these blackbirds make! Descriptions of their whistles, squeals, and rattles include everything from “sweet, tinkling notes” to “rusty gate hinges.” Regardless, Great-tailed Grackles can sure make a lot of loud noises, especially when they gather in enormous flocks numbering in the tens of thousands!


#6. Blue Jay

  • Cyanocitta cristata

blue jay Identifying Characteristics:

  • Backs are covered in beautiful blue feathers with black bars throughout. Underparts are white.
  • Their head is surrounded by a black necklace and has a blue crest on top.
  • Males and females look the same.

Some people dislike Blue Jays, but I love their bold personalities. Their high intelligence makes these birds interesting to observe, not to mention their plumage is stunning.

Blue Jay Range Map

blue jay range map Typically they visit the feeders noisily, fit as much food as possible in their throat sacks, and leave quickly to cache their bounty. My favorite foods to use are whole peanuts, as Blue Jays are one of the only birds that can crack open the shells to access the inside! You can also use sunflower seeds and corn to attract them.

Blue Jays are one of the noisier backyard birds in Dallas. The most common vocalization that I hear is their alarm call, which sounds like it’s saying “jeer.” These birds are also excellent mimics and frequently imitate hawks. They are so good it’s hard to tell the difference between which bird is present. It’s thought that jays do this to deceive other birds into believing a hawk is actually present. Not a bad plan if you want to get a bird feeder all to yourself!


#7. American Robin

  • Turdus migratorius

american robin - types of birds in the united states Identifying Characteristics:

  • A beautiful thrush that features a rusty red breast and a dark head and back.
  • Look for a white throat and white splotches around the eyes.
  • Both sexes are similar, except that females appear paler.

American Robins are one of the most familiar animals in Dallas!

They inhabit a wide variety of habitats and are found virtually everywhere, from forests to grasslands. But these thrushes are comfortable around people and are common to see in backyards.

American Robin Range Map

american robin range map Even though they are abundant, American Robins rarely visit bird feeders because they don’t eat seeds. Instead, their diet consists of invertebrates (worms, insects, snails) and fruit. For example, I see robins frequently in my backyard, pulling up earthworms in the grass! american robin eggs and nest These birds also commonly nest near people. Look for an open cup-shaped nest that has 3-5 beautiful, distinctive sky blue color eggs. American Robins sing a string of clear whistles, which is a familiar sound in spring. (Listen below) Many people describe the sound as sounding like the bird is saying “cheerily, cheer up, cheer up, cheerily, cheer up.”


#8. Great Blue Heron

  • Ardea herodias

great blue heron Identifying Characteristics:

  • A very tall and large bird, with a long neck and a wide black stripe over their eye.
  • As the name suggests, they are a grayish-blue color.
  • Long feather plumes on their head, neck, and back.

Great Blue Heron Range Map

great blue heron range map

Great Blue Herons are typically seen in Dallas along the edges of rivers, lakes, and wetlands.

Most of the time, they will either be motionless or moving very slowly through the water, looking for their prey. But watch them closely because when an opportunity presents itself, these herons will strike quickly and ferociously to grab something to eat. Common foods include fish, frogs, reptiles, small mammals, and even other birds. https://youtu.be/nIjT201Hs_U?t=33

Check out the Bird Watching HQ YouTube Channel HERE!

Great Blue Herons appear majestic in flight, and once you know what to look for, it’s pretty easy to spot them. Watch the skies for a LARGE bird that folds its neck into an “S” shape and has its legs trailing straight behind. Believe it or not, Great Blue Herons mostly build their nests, which are made out of sticks, very high up in trees. In addition, they almost always nest in large colonies that can include up to 500 different breeding pairs. And unbelievably, almost all of the breeding pairs nest in the same few trees! When disturbed, these large birds make a loud “kraak” or “fraunk” sound, which can also be heard when in flight. Listen below!


#9. Red-bellied Woodpecker

  • Melanerpes carolinus

Red-bellied Woodpeckers are one of my FAVORITE birds to see at my feeders. I think they are absolutely gorgeous with their black and white barred backs.

But this woodpecker’s name can be confusing since their bellies don’t actually contain much red coloring, other than an indistinct red wash.

Most of the red on these birds is on their head. In fact, the red coloring is actually the only way to tell males and females apart!

  • Males have a bright red plumage that extends from their beaks to the back of their necks.
  • Females only have red on the back of their necks.

Red-bellied Woodpecker Range Map

 

Red-bellied Woodpeckers are common to see visiting feeders in Dallas!

I see them almost daily in my backyard. They love eating peanuts, sunflower seeds, and suet (which is especially popular during the winter months).

Click PLAY to watch a Red-bellied Woodpecker eating suet and peanuts.

Another great way to find this woodpecker is to learn its calls! It’s quite common to hear them in forests and wooded suburbs and parks. Listen for a rolling “churr-churr-churr.” Press PLAY below to hear a Red-bellied Woodpecker!


#10. White-winged Dove

  • Zenaida asiatica

white winged dove Identifying Characteristics:

  • A pale grayish-brown dove with a white stripe on the edge of the wing.
  • Short, square-tipped tail.
  • Distinctive black mark on their cheek.

White-winged Doves have adapted well to the presence of humans, and they are commonly found in cities and backyards in Dallas. They readily visit bird feeding stations that offer sunflower seeds, safflower seeds, milo, and cracked corn.

White-winged Dove Range Map

white winged dove range map   Like other dove species, White-winged Doves have a few interesting abilities:

  • When nestlings are born, the parents feed them something known as “crop milk.” This secretion is regurgitated from the lining of the esophagus.
  • Pigeons and doves can drink water while their head is down. They don’t need to look skyward to swallow, which is rare among birds.

Males sing to attract females and make a series of hooting coos, which sounds like they are saying, “who cooks for you.” Many times, the final coo is longer than the rest.


Which of these birds have you seen before in Dallas?

Leave a comment below!


To learn more about other birds in Dallas, check out my other guides!

  The range maps above were generously shared with permission from The Birds of The World, published by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. I use their site OFTEN to learn new information about birds!

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