2 Types of Frogs Found in Alaska! (ID Guide)

What kind of frogs can you find in Alaska?”

Common Arizona Frogs

Today, I’m providing a guide to teach you about the two different kinds of frogs found in Alaska.

One of the BEST ways to find frogs is to learn the noises they make. So, in addition to pictures, you will find audio samples for each species below!

2 Frog Species in Alaska:


#1. Wood Frog

frogs in alaska

  • Lithobates sylvaticus

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Adult body lengths range from 1.5 to 3.25 inches.
  • Coloration is various shades of brown, gray, red, or green, with females tending to be more brightly colored.
  • Distinct black marking across the eyes, which resembles a mask.

Woods Frogs are by far the most common frog in Alaska.

As the name suggests, Wood Frogs are found in moist woodland habitats, including forested swamps, ravines, and bogs. They travel widely and visit seasonal pools to breed.

Wood Frog Range Map

wood frog range map

This incredible little frog has a wide range across North America. They have adapted to cold climates by being able to freeze over the winter. Their breathing and heartbeat stop, and their bodies produce a type of antifreeze that prevents their cells from bursting. In the spring, they thaw and begin feeding again.

Interestingly, Wood Frogs seem to be able to recognize their family. Scientists have found that as tadpoles, siblings will seek each other out and group together!

Wood Frogs are one of the first amphibians to emerge after the snow melts. Listen for a call that sounds a bit like a clucking chicken near vernal pools and other small bodies of water!


#2. Columbia Spotted Frog 

  • Rana luteiventris

frogs in alaska

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Green or brown with black spots on its back
  • The upper lip and belly are white.
  • Compared to other frogs, they have shorter back legs, upturned eyes, and a narrower snout.

You may get lucky and spot one of these frogs in southeast Alaska (panhandle).

Columbia Spotted Frogs are almost always spotted near permanent bodies of water, such as ponds, lakes, slow-moving streams, and marshes. In addition, they need lots of vegetation to provide adequate protection because many different predators hunt them!

Females lay up to 1,300 eggs at a time in shallow water. Interestingly, once laid, this mass of eggs absorbs water and can grow to the size of a softball! And these eggs are not attached to anything, so they just float around until the tadpoles are ready to hatch.

To attract a female, male frogs will sing a song that ranges from long, deep sounds to clicks. You can listen to an example of the clicks below:


Do you need additional help identifying frogs in Alaska?

Try this field guide!


Which of these frogs have you seen in Alaska?

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