8 Types of Grey Birds Found in Minnesota! (2022)

Did you recently see a mystery GREY bird in Minnesota?

Types of grey birds in Minnesota

If so, I’m guessing you are trying to figure out how to identify the species correctly!

 

Well, you are in the right place. Below, you will learn about the types of GREY birds found in Minnesota. I’ve included high-quality pictures and range maps to help you!

 

The list below focuses on the most COMMON grey birds, many of which are often seen visiting bird feeders. I did not include any birds of prey or water birds. If you need help with either of these types of birds, then check out the following articles:

 

8 Types of Grey Birds Found in Minnesota:


#1. White-breasted Nuthatch

  • Sitta carolinensis

Birds that are grey in Minnesota

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Both sexes look almost the same.
  • Males have a black cap on the top of their heads.
  • Females display a lighter, more gray crown.

 

White-breasted Nuthatches are compact birds with no neck, a short tail, and a long pointy bill. Color-wise, they have distinctive white cheeks and chest, along with a gray back.

White-breasted Nuthatch Range Map

Look for these grey birds in Minnesota in deciduous forests. But they adapt well to the presence of humans and are often seen at parks, cemeteries, and wooded backyards visiting bird feeders. To attract nuthatches, use sunflower seeds, peanuts, suet, safflower seeds, and mealworms.

 

These birds are incredibly vocal AND make distinctive noises that are relatively easy to identify! You are most likely to hear a “yank” call, which is given at any time of year. This loud and distinctive noise is often repeated several times in a row. (Press PLAY to listen below)


#2. Mourning Dove

  • Zenaida macroura

Minnesota grey birds

Identifying Characteristics:
  • A mostly grayish dove with large black spots on the wings and a long thin tail.
  • Look for pinkish legs, a black bill, and a distinctive blue eye-ring.
  • Males and females look the same.

 

This grey bird is one of the most familiar in Minnesota.

 

Look for them perched high up in trees or on a telephone wire near your home. They are also commonly seen on the ground, where they do most of their feeding.

Mourning Dove Range Map

mourning dove range map

Mourning Doves are common visitors to bird feeding stations! To attract them, try putting out their favorite foods, which include millet, shelled sunflower seeds, nyjer seeds, cracked corn, and safflower seeds. They are probably most comfortable feeding on the ground, so make sure to throw a bunch of food there.

 

It’s common to hear Mourning Doves in Minnesota.

 

Listen for a low “coo-ah, coo, coo, coo.In fact, this mournful sound is how the dove got its name! Many people commonly mistake this sound for an owl. (Press PLAY above!)

 


#3. Eurasian Collared-Dove

  • Streptopelia decaocto

grey birds in Minnesota

Identifying Characteristics:

  • A mostly sandy gray bird with a long, square-tipped tail.
  • As the name suggests, look for a black collar on the back of the neck.

 

Interestingly, these grey birds are invasive to southern Minnesota.

 

Unfortunately, somebody introduced Eurasian Collared-Doves to the Bahamas in the 1970s, and since then, they have rapidly spread. In fact, their population is still spreading!

Eurasian Collared-Dove Range Map

Eurasian collared dove range map

 

One of the reasons these grey birds colonized here so quickly is due to their comfort level with humans. They have thrived being around bird feeders and in urban and suburban areas. It’s common to see them on the ground or platform feeders eating grains and seeds.

 

How do you tell them apart from Mourning Doves?

At first glance, Eurasian Collared-Doves look very similar to Mourning Doves. Here’s how to tell them apart:

  • Mourning Doves are smaller and have black dots on their wings.
  • Eurasian Collared-Doves are larger and have a black crescent around their neck.

 


#4. Dark-eyed Junco

  • Junco hyemalis

Types of grey birds in Minnesota

Identifying characteristics:

  • Smooth and soft-looking slate gray with a white belly.
  • Small pale bill, long tail with white outer feathers.

 

Dark-eyed Juncos are probably the most common grey bird in Minnesota. A recent estimate sets their population around 630 million.

 

You can easily identify these sparrows by how smooth their feathers look. It appears like they would be as soft as a chinchilla to touch. πŸ™‚

Dark-eyed Junco Range Map

dark eyed junco range map

This species is found in pine and mixed-coniferous forests when they breed, but in winter, they are in fields, parks, woodlands, and backyards. Dark-eyed Juncos like to visit feeders in the winter, but ONLY ON THE GROUND, where they consume fallen seeds.

 


#5. Black-capped Chickadee

  • Poecile atricapillus

small grey birds

 

These grey birds are one of the most beloved species in Minnesota, and it’s easy to see why! Black-capped Chickadees are often described as β€œcute,” They are tiny, with an oversized head that features a black cap and bib.

 

Naturally, look for them in open deciduous forests, thickets, and cottonwood groves. They also adapt easily to the presence of people and are common to see in backyards and parks.

Black-capped Chickadee Range Map

black capped chickadee range map

 

In fact, once you set up a new bird feeder, chickadees will likely be the first birds to visit, as they are curious about anything new in their territory. The best foods to use are sunflower seeds, peanuts, and suet. Their small size and athletic ability mean these birds can use just about any type of feeder!

 


#6. Gray Catbird

  • Dumetella carolinensis

gray catbird

Identifying Characteristics:

  • They are completely grey overall, except for their black cap.

 

Gray Catbirds are incredible vocalists who mimic the songs of many other birds!

 

And luckily, their most common call is incredibly easy to identify. Listen for a raspy, cat-like “meow,” which is how they got their name! Seriously, if you hear a noise that sounds like a cat in a dense thicket, you are likely listening to a Gray Catbird.

Gray Catbird Range Map

grey catbird range map

These completely gray birds will also visit bird feeders in Minnesota. The secret is grape jelly! Yes, you read that correctly. Gray Catbirds regularly visit my feeding station when I set out small cups of grape jelly (primarily used to attract orioles).

 


#7. Northern Mockingbird

  • Mimus polyglottos

northern mockingbird

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Medium-sized grey songbird with a LONG, slender tail.
  • Distinctive white wing patches that are visible when in flight.

 

These grey birds are NOT easy to miss in Minnesota!

 

First, Northern Mockingbirds LOVE to sing, and they almost never stop. Sometimes they will even sing through the entire night. If this happens to you, it’s advised to keep your windows closed if you want to get any sleep. πŸ™‚

Northern Mockingbird Range Map

northern mockingbird range map

In addition, Northern Mockingbirds have bold personalities. For example, it’s common for them to harass other birds by flying slowly around them and then approaching with their wings up, showing off their white wing patches.

 

These grey birds are common in backyards, but they rarely eat from bird feeders. Nonetheless, I have heard from many people complaining that mockingbirds are scaring away the other birds from their feeders, even though mockingbirds don’t even eat from feeders themselves!

 


#8. Canada Jay / Gray Jay

  • Perisoreus canadensis

gray jay / canada jay

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Paler grey on the belly. Darker gray on the backs.
  • White cheeks, throat, and forehead.
  • Short beak and a long tail.

 

It’s hard to describe a Canada Jay other than “cute.” These grey birds are really smart and adapt to their surroundings, which allows them to eat almost anything.

 

Seriously, they have been observed eating the following weird things: ticks off the back of a moose, baby bats, amphibians, baby birds, in addition to more normal foods like invertebrates, seeds, and berries.

Canada Jay Range Map

canada jay range map

Another interesting fact about this grey bird is that they raise their babies during late winter! And because they live so far north in the boreal forests, their chicks grow up in almost complete darkness. Interestingly, they don’t attempt to raise a second brood of babies in May or June, which is when most other species nest and conditions seem more favorable.

 

So do you call this bird a Canada Jay or Gray Jay? Well, the correct name is now Canada Jay, as the name was changed in 2018 by the American Ornithological Society from the Gray Jay. But old habits die hard, and many birders still refer to this bold corvid as a Gray Jay.

 


Did you find the grey bird you were looking for?

 

If not, you may want to purchase a field guide dedicated to bird identification (see link below). In this post, I focused on the most COMMON grey birds found in Minnesota.

 


Which of these GREY birds have you seen in Minnesota?

 

Leave a COMMENT below! Make sure to mention where the grey bird was seen. πŸ™‚

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