The 4 Types of Grosbeaks in Canada! (ID Guide)

What kinds of grosbeaks can you find in Canada?

Kinds of Grosbeaks in Canada

The name “Grosbeak” may imply that their beaks are gross, but they are anything but that.

 

In actuality, the meaning of the name comes from the Latin words “gros” and “beccus,” meaning “large beaks.This name is fitting since these beautiful birds rely on their thick bills to crack open nuts and seeds.

 

Luckily, all types of grosbeaks in Canada visit bird feeders, so you have a good chance of attracting multiple species to your yard. If you’re lucky, you may even see a grosbeak at my bird feeding station right now! I have a LIVE high-definition camera watching my bird feeders 24/7. 🙂

 

To learn more about other birds that live near you, check out these guides!

 

Here are the FOUR types of grosbeaks that live in Canada:

 


#1. Evening Grosbeak

  • Coccothraustes vespertinus

Types of Grosbeaks found in Canada

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Both sexes have a large, thick, conical beak and are the size of an American Robin.
  • Males are yellow and black with a prominent white patch in the wings and a bright yellow stripe over the eye.
  • Females are mostly gray with white and black wings and a greenish-yellow tinge on their neck and sides.

 

These birds are one of the most beautiful grosbeaks in Canada!

 

Typically, Evening Grosbeaks are found in the northern coniferous forests, and in winter, they can be found in many parts of Canada as they search for food.

 

Evening Grosbeaks are known for their large and strong bill. They use their robust bills to crack open seeds that other birds are unable to open.

Evening Grosbeak Range Map

evening grosbeak range map

In fact, this species will show up at feeders far south of their normal winter range, which provides a treat for backyard birders. You can attract them with sunflower seeds placed onto a large platform feeder, allowing ample room for them to land and eat.

 

Interestingly, Evening Grosbeaks don’t sing songs! But they do have some simple calls, including sweet, piercing notes and burry chirps, which you can hear below!

 


#2. Rose-breasted Grosbeak

  • Pheucticus ludovicianus

Common Grosbeaks species in Canada

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Stocky birds with a large, triangular bill. About the size of an American Robin.
  • Males have black backs and wings, with a distinctive red mark on their white breast.
  • Females are heavily streaked with a white eyebrow and a pale bill.

 

It’s easy to see how these beautiful grosbeaks got their name. One look at the males, and you’ll immediately notice the bright red plumage topping their white breasts. On the other hand, females can be difficult to identify, as they look similar to many other birds.

 

Rose-breasted Grosbeaks are common visitors to feeders in Canada!

 

They use their huge triangular bill to crack open sunflower seeds. I’ve never seen one of these grosbeaks use a tube feeder; I don’t think the perches provide enough space for them. So instead, the best feeders to attract them are hoppers, platforms, or trays.

 

Rose-breasted Grosbeak Range Map

Rose-breasted Grosbeak males sing to establish territories and attract females. Unfortunately, when the female shows up, the male sometimes plays hard-to-get, rejecting her for a day or two before finally accepting her as a mate! But to make up for this behavior, they give the females a break and help sit on the nest to keep the eggs warm.

 

Rose-breasted Grosbeaks are known for their beautiful song. It sounds similar to an American Robin but better! Listen for a long series of notes that rise and fall. If you hear one, make sure to look for the male singing from an elevated perch.

 


#3. Black-headed Grosbeak

  • Pheucticus melanocephalus

Black-headed Grosbeak male and female

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Both sexes have large heads, thick beaks, short and thick necks, and a short tail that gives them a compact, chunky look.
  • Males are an orange-cinnamon color with a black head and black and white wings.
  • Females and immature males feature grayish bills, and their underwing flashes bright yellow when flying.

 

Black-headed Grosbeaks like to hide in thick foliage and are known to hop around while searching for food. Their giant beaks are perfectly adapted for cracking seeds, but they also use them to crush hard-bodied invertebrates like snails!

Black-headed Grosbeak Range Map

black-headed grosbeak range map

Like other grosbeaks in Canada, you can attract Black-headed Grosbeaks by providing sunflower seeds. But interestingly, this species has a sweet tooth and is also known to visit nectar feeders! They will nest in your backyard and garden if there’s enough cover and water nearby.

 

Both male and female Black-headed Grosbeaks sing although females sing less, and it’s not as loud. Listen for a rich song with high-pitched notes from treetops.

 


#4. Pine Grosbeak

  • Pinicola enucleator

Pine Grosbeak male and female

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Large, plump grosbeaks. Look for dark gray wings with two white lines across the middle.
  • Males are reddish-pink and gray.
  • Females and young males are grayish with tints of reddish-orange or yellow on the head and rump.

 

Pine Grosbeaks regularly visit feeders in Canada, especially during the winter. If you want to attract them, try using a hopper or platform feeder because of the bird’s larger size. Fill the feeders with sunflower seeds.

 

They are typically easy to identify if one does land on your feeders since they’re bigger than most other birds.

 

Pine Grossbeak Range Map

pine grosbeak range map

Pine Grosbeaks are relatively easy to find and see due to their slow-moving (some people call sluggish) behavior. In addition, they’re fairly tame and don’t scare easily.

 

Male Pine Grosbeaks sing a high-pitched warble that goes up and down. Listen below! Females don’t sing very often.

 


Which of these grosbeaks have you seen before in Canada?

 

Leave a comment below!

 

The range maps above were generously shared with permission from Birds of the World, published by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. I use their site OFTEN to learn new information about birds!

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