7 Kinds of PINK Wildflowers in Nevada (w/Pics)

Did you find a PINK wildflower in Nevada?

Types of pink wildflowers in Nevada

 

If so, I’m sure you’re wondering what type of wildflower you found! Luckily, you can use this guide to help you identify it. ūüôā

 

Please be aware that today I’m ONLY listing and focusing on the most COMMON pink wildflowers. There are so many species, varieties, and subspecies that it would be impossible to name them all. But if you want to dive deeper into all the pink wildflowers in Nevada, check out this field guide!

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Today, we will look at 7 different PINK wildflowers found in Nevada.

 


#1. Swamp Milkweed

  • Asclepias incarnata

Also known as: Pink Milkweed

Pink wildflowers in Nevada

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-11
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 24-72 in (61-183 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Summer to Fall
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

 

Swamp Milkweed is a native pink wildflower in Nevada.

 

It grows in wet meadows and along lakeshores. Look for its clusters of deep pink flowers to identify it.

 

If you want a variety of pollinators to visit your garden, Swamp Milkweed is the ideal wildflower to plant. Its clusters of fragrant flowers are attractive to hummingbirds, bees, and butterflies. The leaves are an incredibly important food source for Monarch caterpillars.

 


#2. Spreading Dogbane

  • Apocynum androsaemifolium

Also known as: Fly-trap Dogbane, Bitterroot

Nevada pink wildflowers

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 2-9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 24-60 in (61-152 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Summer
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Full Shade

 

As you might have guessed from its name, Spreading Dogbane is a prolific grower, which is why you’ll find it widespread across both North America and Europe. It’s called “dogbane” because it is highly poisonous to dogs (and humans too).

 

Spreading Dogbane has small, pink bell-shaped flowers and a scent similar to lilac. Look for this pink wildflower in Nevada in the sandy soil of streambanks.

 


#3. Crown Vetch

  • Securigera varia

Also known as: Purple Crownvetch, Crownvetch

Types of pink wildflowers in Nevada

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 12-72 in (30-183 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Summer to Fall
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

 

Even though the large, pink clover-like blooms of Crown Vetch are beautiful, this plant is invasive in North America. Native to Europe, Asia, and Africa, Crown Vetch was introduced locally to be used as a groundcover in controlling soil erosion.

 

This pink wildflower grows in Nevada on sunny, sandy banks where it can push out less hardy plants.

 

If you plant Crown Vetch on your property, choose an isolated location far away from flower gardens. Don’t forget to control its growth so it doesn’t spread to other areas and invade native species and ecosystems.

 


#4. Wild Mint

  • Mentha arvensis

Pink wildflowers in Nevada

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-8
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 3.9-39 in (10-99 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Late Spring to Early Summer
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Light Shade

 

Wild Mint is a native wildflower with dense clusters of lavender, pink, or white bell-shaped flowers. Like other species of mint, the fragrance is most potent when the leaves are damaged.

 

Look for this pink wildflower in Nevada in wetlands with partial sunlight. It grows best on stream and river banks.

 


#5. Fireweed

  • Chamerion angustifolium

Also known as: Willow Herb

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 2-8
  • Life Cycle: Annual or Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 18-120 in (46-305 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Late Spring and Summer
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

 

True to its name, Fireweed is a resilient plant that will be the first to grow in clearings recently devastated by forest fires. In fact, Fireweed was seen growing throughout Washington State one year after Mount St. Helens erupted in 1980.

 

To find Fireweed, look for striking spikes of purplish-pink flowers covering a landscape. Hummingbirds, moths, and butterflies like to feed on this pink wildflower in Nevada.

 


#6. Deptford Pink

  • Dianthus armeria

Also known as: Grass Pink

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8a
  • Life Cycle: Annual or Biennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 12-30 in (30-76 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Spring to Fall
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

 

The blooms of the Deptford Pink may be tiny, but they make up for their small size with their gorgeous coloring. A closer look at the petals will reveal an intricately dotted pattern of pink, white, and purple.

 

Deptford Pink is native to Europe, but this pink wildflower is a naturalized species in Nevada. It grows so well that it can take over roadsides, ditches, and fields.

 

Although the nectar is attractive to butterflies, skippers, and bees, Deptford Pink is a self-pollinating plant that doesn’t rely much on these insects.

 


#7. Everlasting Pea

  • Lathyrus latifolius

Also known as: Perennial Pea, Perennial Peavine

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 60-120 in (152-305 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Summer to Fall
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

 

The Everlasting Pea is a frost-hardy vine that requires little care and grows like a weed when not controlled. It is native to Europe but has been naturalized in North America since the 1700s. Look for this pink wildflower in Nevada on sunny banks with clay-rich soil.

 

The long tendrils and purplish-pink flowers of the Everlasting Pea look beautiful when climbing trellises or fences in your garden. You can also use it as a sprawling groundcover for banks and slopes.

 

Butterflies and bees find the pea-shaped blooms attractive. The vibrant colors will fade to white as the Everlasting Pea matures.

 


Which of these pink wildflowers have you seen before in Nevada?

 

Leave a comment below!

 

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