The 2 Types of Rattlesnakes in Minnesota! (ID Guide)

Believe it or not, you can find TWO types of rattlesnakes in Minnesota!

 

But please don’t live in fear, thinking that you are going to be bitten. In general, rattlesnakes try to avoid any contact or interaction with people. The whole reason they have a rattle is to warn you to stay away! As long as you leave them alone, you shouldn’t have any trouble.

 

Today, you will learn what each rattlesnake species looks like, along with detailed pictures to help you make a correct identification. In addition, you will learn the habitat in which they can be found, along with some interesting facts!

types of rattlesnakes in Minnesota

Here are the 2 rattlesnake species that live in Minnesota!

 

*If you come across any of these species, PLEASE DO NOT DISTURB! Rattlesnakes are dangerous animals and should be left alone. The more you agitate them, the more likely you could get bitten. DO NOT RELY ON THIS ARTICLE to correctly identify a rattlesnake that has recently bitten you. If you have recently been bitten, GO DIRECTLY to the nearest hospital to get help and determine if the snake is venomous.*

 


#1. Timber Rattlesnake

  • Crotalus horridus

rattlesnakes in Minnesota

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Adults typically range from 30 to 60 inches in length.
  • Coloration is variable and generally ranges from yellowish-brown to gray to almost black. Look for dark brown or black crossbands on their back.
  • Heavy-bodied with a characteristic rattle on the tail.

 

The Timber Rattlesnake, also known as the Canebrake Rattlesnake, can be found in small areas in southeast Minnesota. Look for them in lowland thickets, high areas around rivers and flood plains, agricultural areas, deciduous forests, and coniferous forests.

Timber Rattlesnake Range Map

timber rattlesnake range map

Credit: Virginia Herpetological Society

 

These rattlesnakes are ambush predators, waiting for unsuspecting prey to come within range of their strike. They feed primarily on small mammals but may also consume frogs, birds, and other smaller snakes. Timber Rattlesnakes strike their prey and release them, waiting until the venom has taken effect before eating them.

 

Due to their large size, long fangs, and high venom yield, these rattlesnakes are potentially the most dangerous snake found in North America. Luckily, Timber Rattlenskaes have a mild disposition and don’t often bite. They also typically give plenty of warning by rattling and posturing.

 

The Timber Rattlesnake has played an interesting role in U.S. history. As it can be found in the area of the original 13 Colonies, it was used as a symbol during the American Revolution. In 1775 it was featured at the center of the “Gadsden Flag.” This yellow flag depicts a coiled and ready-to-strike Timber Rattlesnake and the words “Don’t Tread on Me.”

 


#2. Eastern Massasauga

  • Sistrurus catenatus

common kinds of rattlesnakes in Minnesota

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Adults are typically around 2 feet in length.
  • Coloration is gray or light brown with darker chocolate-brown blotches on the back and smaller ones on the sides, which feature light edges.
  • Thick body, vertical pupils, and a heart-shaped head.

 

These small rattlesnakes live in wet habitats in extreme southeast Minnesota.

 

The name “Massasauga” actually comes from the Chippewa language and means “great river mouth” and describes their habitat. Look for them in floodplain forests, shrub swamps, low areas along rivers and lakes, wet prairies, moist grasslands, bogs, and marshes. They often migrate to drier regions adjacent to these habitats during the summer.

Eastern Massasauga Range Map

It’s rare to hear an Eastern Massasauga rattle!

 

Instead, these small rattlesnakes typically remain motionless when threatened, relying on their small size and excellent camouflage to avoid predators. And even when they do use their rattle, it doesn’t sound like a traditional rattlesnake. Instead, the massasauga’s rattle has been described as a buzzing sound, similar to a bee stuck in a spider’s web!

 

This rattlesnake is listed as threatened, endangered, or a species of concern in all parts of its range. Historically, these snakes have faced pressure from hunting, and many states had bounties and roundups for them. Today they are still often killed out of fear AND face diminishing wetland habitat.

 

Getting bitten by an Eastern Massasauga in Minnesota is incredibly rare due to their secretive and shy nature, combined with their threatened population. The only times they bite seem to be when handled or accidentally stepped on!

 

But if you are bitten, you should seek medical attention right away. These rattlesnakes have cytotoxic venom (poisonous to cells) that destroys tissue, which also has the dangerous quality of disrupting blood flow and preventing clotting.

 


Do you need additional help identifying a rattlesnake?

I recommend purchasing a Peterson Field Guide to the Reptiles and Amphibians of North America. These books have lots of helpful information, including pictures and range maps.

View Cost - Amazon

 


Which of these rattlesnakes have YOU seen before in Minnesota?

 

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