8 Types of Red Birds Found In Alaska! (ID GUIDE)

Did you see a RED bird in Alaska?

Common Red Birds in Alaska

 

If so, I’m sure you’re wondering what type of bird it was! Luckily, you can use the guide below to help you figure it out!

 

There are 8 birds in Alaska that are considered “red.”

 

For the purpose of this article, I include primarily red and partially red birds.

 

Fortunately, many species of RED birds visit bird feeders, so you have a chance of attracting them to your yard. If you’re incredibly fortunate, you may even see one at my bird feeding station right now!

I have a LIVE high-definition camera watching my bird feeders 24/7. 🙂

 

To learn more about other birds that live near you, check out these guides!

 

Here are the 8 birds that are RED in Alaska!

 


#1. Northern Cardinal

  • Cardinalis cardinalis

Types of Red Birds found in Alaska

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Males are a stunning red with a black mask and throat.
  • Females are pale orangish-brown with red on their crest, wings, and tail.
  • Both sexes have a crest on their head and a short, thick bill perfect for cracking seeds.

 

Without a doubt, the Northern Cardinal is one of the most popular and recognizable RED birds in Alaska. They are not only beautifully colored, but they are common to see at bird feeders!

Northern Cardinal Range Map

northern cardinal range map

And with a bit of practice, it’s easy to identify Northern Cardinals by their songs and sounds. Interestingly, unlike most other songbirds in Alaska, even females sing.

  • The most common song you will probably hear is a series of clear whistled melodies that sound like the bird is saying “birdie-birdie-birdie” or “cheer-cheer-cheer.” (Listen below!)

 


#2. House Finch

  • Haemorhous mexicanus

Red Birds species that live in Alaska

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Males are rosy red around their heads and upper breasts. They have brown streaks on their back, tail, and belly.
  • Females are brown with streaks on their back, tail, and belly.
  • Both sexes have notched tails and conical beaks designed to eat seeds.

 

It’s common to see these red birds in Alaska near people.

 

Look for them around buildings, backyards, parks, and other urban and suburban areas. As you can see, only males are red.

House Finch Range Map

 

house finch range map

House Finches are often the first birds to discover new bird feeders. These birds are intensely curious and rarely travel alone, so their arrival often helps other birds find your feeders too! I see them eating sunflower seed, Nyjer seed, and safflower in my yard.

 

House Finches have an enjoyable song, which can be heard year-round. Listen below to a series of jumbled, warbled notes.

 


#3. American Robin

  • Turdus migratorius

Common Red Birds species in Alaska

Identifying Characteristics:

  • A beautiful thrush that features a rusty red breast and a dark head and back.
  • Look for a white throat and white splotches around the eyes.
  • Both sexes are similar, except that females appear paler.

 

American Robins are one of the most familiar red birds in Alaska!

 

Although I think their breast looks orange, many others consider it rusty red.

 

They inhabit a wide variety of habitats and naturally are found everywhere, from forests to the tundra. But these thrushes are comfortable around people and are common to see in backyards.

American Robin Range Map

american robin range map

Even though they’re abundant, American Robins rarely visit bird feeders because they don’t eat seeds. Instead, their diet consists of invertebrates (worms, insects, snails) and fruit. For example, I see robins frequently in my backyard, pulling up earthworms in the grass!

 

These red birds also commonly nest near people. Look for an open, cup-shaped nest with 3-5 beautiful, distinctive sky blue eggs.

 

American Robins sing a string of clear whistles, a familiar sound in spring. Many people describe its song as sounding like the bird is saying, “cheerily, cheer up, cheer up, cheerily, cheer up.” Listen below.

 


#4. Common Redpoll

  • Acanthis flammea

Alaska Red Birds species

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Both sexes are small, white, and brown. Look for streaks on their sides and a small red patch on their forehead.
  • Males have a pale red vest on the chest and upper flanks.

 

These red birds visit backyard bird feeders in Alaska, especially during the winter. Due to their small bill size, they prefer eating tiny seeds like Nyjer (thistle) and shelled sunflower when visiting.

Common Redpoll Range Map

common redpoll range map

These red birds travel great distances and can turn up almost anywhere!

 

For example, one bird banded in Michigan showed up in Siberia. Another one in Belgium was found again in China!

 


#5. Pine Grosbeak

  • Pinicola enucleator

Pine Grosbeak male and female

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Large, plump finches. Look for dark gray wings with two white lines across the middle.
  • Males are reddish-pink and gray.
  • Females and young males are grayish with reddish-orange or yellow tints on the head and rump.

 

These red birds are one of the largest finches in Alaska!

 

If one lands on your feeder, they’re typically easy to identify since they’re bigger than most other birds.

 

Pine Grosbeaks frequently visit feeders, especially during the winter. If you want to attract them, try using a hopper or platform feeder because of the bird’s larger size. Fill the feeders with sunflower seeds.

Pine Grossbeak Range Map

pine grosbeak range map

Male Pine Grosbeaks sing a high-pitched warble that goes up and down. Listen below! Females don’t sing very often.

 


#6. Red Crossbill

  • Loxia curvirostra

red crossbill pic

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Sparrow-sized. Look for their distinctive crisscrossed bills (which means the upper and lower tips of their beak don’t align; they cross, like crossing your fingers)
  • Males are red overall with darker brownish-red wings and white wing bars.
  • Females are full-bodied and yellowish with dark unmarked wings.

 

As their name suggests, Red Crossbills have crisscrossed bills, similar to if you cross your fingers. They adapted these oddly shaped bills to help them break into tightly closed cones, giving them an advantage over other red bird species in Alaska.

 

They’re found in large coniferous forests during their breeding season, mainly spruce, pine, Douglas-fir, hemlock, or larch with recent cone crops. But in winter, they wander wherever they need to go to find food. While not incredibly common, these red birds will sometimes visit bird feeders in Alaska and eat sunflower seeds.

Red Crossbill Range Map

red crossbill range map

Red Crossbills are highly dependent on conifer seeds. They even feed them to their babies instead of insects like most other songbirds. These finches typically breed in late summer but can breed any time during the year if a large enough cone crop is available.

 

Males sing a variably sweet warble, which sounds like “chipa-chipa-chipa, chee-chee-chee.”Females rarely sing, but call notes are sharp and metallic.

 


#7. White-winged Crossbill

  • Loxia leucoptera

White-winged Crossbill male and female

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Crisscrossed billis used to separate pine cone scales to access the seeds.
  • Males are rose-pink with black wings and tails. Look for two white lines of contrasting color across the middle of the wing.
  • Females and young males are yellowish but with the same wing and tail pattern as the adult males.

 

White-winged Crossbills get their name from the shape of their bill! These finches evolved these unique beaks to open up pine cones so that they could eat the seeds inside.

 

Individual White-winged Crossbills can eat up to 3,000 conifer seeds each day. Some people can locate crossbills by hearing them crunching while opening cones in the trees.

White-winged Crossbill Range Map

white-winged crossbill range map

You can sometimes attract these red birds to your backyard feeders in Alaska by offering hulled sunflower seeds.

 

Both sexes sing a mixture of vigorous and scattered chirps, warbles, and rattles. Listen below!

 


#8. Red-breasted Sapsucker

  • Sphyrapicus ruber

red-breasted-sapsucker

Red-breasted Sapsuckers are found in Alaska in coniferous forests, typically at lower elevations. Look for a medium-sized bird with a red head and breast and a white spot in front of the eye.

Red-breasted Sapsucker Range Map

As the name suggests, sapsuckers drill wells into trees to eat the sugary liquid that leaks out. Their favorite trees are willows and birches. In addition to sap, these woodpeckers also eat insects and some fruits.

 

Interestingly, Rufous Hummingbirds tend to follow Red-breasted Sapsuckers around. These tiny birds enjoy feeding on the flowing sap that the sapsuckers create and are even known to nest near the sap wells.

 

Their call is a harsh, slurred “whee-ur” or “mew.”

 


Do you need additional help identifying a red bird you have seen?

If so, this field guide should be able to help you.

 


Which of these red birds have you seen before in Alaska?

 

Leave a comment below!

 

The range maps below were generously shared with permission from The Birds Of The World, published by The Cornell Lab of Ornithology. I use their site OFTEN to learn new information about birds!

 

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