Types of Squirrels in Utah! (3 species w/ pictures)

What types of squirrels can you find in Utah?

common squirrels in utah

 

I have found squirrels cause a range of emotions. Some individuals find them adorable and love watching their crazy antics!

 

But many people can’t stand having squirrels around, particularly on their bird feeders! These feeding enthusiasts are constantly battling these acrobatic rodents to keep them on the ground and away from their bird food.

 

Regardless of your personal feelings, I think squirrels are interesting to learn about. If you are curious about all the species that can be found near you, please keep reading. πŸ™‚

 

Below are the 3 types of squirrels that live in Utah!

 

Make sure to pay attention to the range maps to see where each squirrel lives! I have included a few photographs for each species to help you identify the ones you are lucky enough to observe.

 

Do you want to learn how to keep squirrels off your bird feeders?

If so, you should check out my ebook about how to keep these persistent mammals from eating all your expensive bird seed. You should know that I don’t promote any strategies that involve hurting squirrels. πŸ™‚

 

Please let me know which squirrel species you have spotted before in the β€œComments” section below! πŸ™‚

 

Squirrels That Live in UtahΒ (3)

 


#1. American Red Squirrel

american red squirrel - types of squirrels in utah

 

Scientific Name: Tamiasciurus hudsonicus

Average Length (Including tail): 11- 14 inches / 28 – 35.5 cm

Weight: 7.1–8.8 oz / 200–250 g

Lifespan: They experience severe mortality during their first year, as only about 20% of babies survive. For individuals that survive the first year, the average lifespan is still only 2.3 years, with a maximum lifespan of 8 years. Predators include bobcats, coyotes, hawks, owls, foxes, American Martens, and Canadian Lynxes.

 

The American Red Squirrel is widespread across Utah and easy to identify when compared to other squirrel species. As the name suggests, they have a reddish color and white belly that makes them easy to distinguish. Size-wise, they are both MUCH smaller than both gray and fox squirrels but larger than chipmunks.

 

American Red Squirrel Range Map

american red squirrel range map

 

These squirrels are primarily found in coniferous forests due to their diet, which consists of seeds from evergreen trees. But they are equally at home in deciduous forests, backyards, parks, and urban areas, where they adjust their diet to eat foods such as berries, bird eggs, acorns, hazelnuts, mushrooms, mice, and sunflower seeds from backyard bird feeding stations. American Red Squirrels even have a sweet tooth and are known to tap maple trees so they can eat the sugar from the sap!

These squirrels are BEST known for their aggressive personality!

Press PLAY to hear the sounds of an American Red Squirrel!

 

When I go hiking, I almost always see at least one American Red Squirrel, as they are not shy creatures. As soon as I’m spotted, the squirrel typically runs up a tree to sit and then starts making loud chattering noises to alert the whole forest to my presence!

 

And despite their small size, these squirrels run the show if they show up to your bird feeders. I have personally witnessed these feisty rodents chase away more than FIVE Eastern Gray Squirrels away from my feeding station so that they can have the place to themselves. (Watch the video below to see for yourself!)

 

Feeding birds is a challenge with these squirrels around!

 

From a bird feeding perspective, American Red Squirrels present unique challenges if you want to prevent them from eating your birdseed. Here’s why:

red squirrels - species of squirrels in utah

  • These squirrels are small enough to fit through most caged bird feeders. These feeders are designed to prevent larger squirrels (Eastern Gray, Fox) from fitting through while still allowing small songbirds to eat.

 

  • Many bird feeders have been designed to be weight-sensitive and close if enough weight, like that from a squirrel, sits on the perch. Because American Red Squirrels are so small and light, they don’t force the perch to close on many feeders, which allows them to eat as much as they want.

 

Damage caused by an American Red Squirrel!

 

  • These feisty squirrels will do almost ANYTHING to get access to where you store your bird food. For example, I keep my seed stored in a shed, either in metal bins or plastic 5-gallon buckets with lids. As you can see from the damage above, American Red Squirrels are the only animals at my house that chew through hard plastic to get to the seed. Luckily, they haven’t figured out how to chew through metal… yet. πŸ™‚

 


#2. Abert’s Squirrel

aberts squirrel

 

Scientific Name: Sciurus aberti

Average Length (Including tail): 18 – 23 inches / 46 to 58 cm

Weight: 19 – 34 oz / 540 – 971 g

 

The ears on an Abert’s Squirrel, which are also called Tassel-eared Squirrels, are unique, and it’s hard to mistake if you see one. Just look for long tufts of hair on each ear (except that the tufts disappear in summer)! In addition, they have a dark gray coat, pure white underbelly, and a noticeable rusty brown patch of fur on their back. They look a lot like the adorable Eurasian Red Squirrel, except for their color.

 

Abert’s Squirrels are found in Utah, primarily living in coniferous forests close to their favorite tree, the Ponderosa Pine.

 

Abert’s Squirrel Range Map

aberts squirrel range map

 

Ponderosa Pines play an important role in the life of Abert’s Squirrels.

 

In fact, these trees provide everything from food to nesting to protection from predators!

 

  • Food:

While these squirrels eat a wide variety of foods, Ponderosa Pines are their favorite and their primary nutrition throughout the entire year. In warm months, the seeds and buds are consumed. Incredibly, a single squirrel can eat the seeds from up to 75 pine cones per day!

 

During colder months, Abert’s Squirrels eat the inner bark of the actual tree, in addition to twigs. In winter, on average, about 45 twigs are eaten every day!

 

The Ponderosa Pine provides such a consistent food source throughout the year, the Abert’s Squirrel rarely stores any food for winter. This behavior is incredibly unique when it comes to squirrels!

 

  • Nesting:

Females will build twig nests, which resemble large, messy bird nests, on the branches of Ponderosa Pines. Adults will even use these shelters year-round for nightly protection. These squirrels would use a cavity, but pines rarely have holes big enough for nesting purposes.

 

  • Cover:

 

Abert’s Squirrels and Ponderosa Pines go hand in hand. These pine trees not only provide food and nesting areas, but their interlocking canopies serve as protection against predators. Animals such as hawks, particularly the Northern Goshawk, hunt these squirrels regularly.

 

Lastly, these adorable squirrels have a sweet tooth!

 

In spring, it’s possible to see them licking the sugary sap off the bark of Boxelder Trees, which are related to maples.

 


Flying Squirrels

 

When I first heard about flying squirrels, I didn’t believe the person describing them to me.

common types of flying squirrels

 

You see, I am outside a lot and take pride in trying to know and identify as much local wildlife as possible. So when I was told that there are small squirrels that glide from tree to tree at night and are rarely ever seen, I was a bit skeptical.

 

But after some research, I was amazed to learn about flying squirrels!

 

In fact, these unique mammals are more common than most people realize. But since these squirrels are small, nocturnal, and live at the tops of trees, they are RARELY seen. Even now that I know they exist, I still have never actually seen one in person.

 

Do flying squirrels actually fly?

 

Let’s clear up the most commonly asked question about flying squirrels. While the name implies otherwise, these creatures don’t have wings, nor can they fly. What they do have are folds of skin underneath their arms, called a patagium, which extends from their wrists all the way to their ankles.

 

This membrane allows these squirrels to “glide” from tree to tree. So their gliding can give that impression that they are flying.

 

In Utah, there is ONLY ONE flying squirrel species you can observe:

 


#3. Northern Flying Squirrel

northern flying squirrel

 

Scientific Name: Glaucomys sabrinus

Average Length (Including tail): 9.8 – 14.6 inches / 25 – 37 cm

Weight: 3.9 – 8.1 oz / 110 – 230 grams

Lifespan: Not much is known, but it seems that most individuals live less than 4 years. Owls are their main predator, which makes sense since both species are nocturnal.

 

These squirrels have cinnamon or light brown colored fur, with whitish fur on their belly. You will notice their huge black eyes, which help them see at night!

 

Northern Flying Squirrel Range Map

northern flying squirrel range map

 

To find a Northern Flying Squirrel, you will need to look in forests dominated by conifer trees.

 

Southern Flying Squirrels, which are closely related, prefer living in deciduous forests. Because of this fact, these two species rarely have ranges that overlap.

 

While these nocturnal rodents eat nuts and acorns like typical diurnal tree squirrels, it’s not the majority of their diet. Interestingly, fungi (mushrooms) and lichens are their main source of nutrition. Some other foods that are eaten include insects, bird eggs, and tree sap.

Unlike most other squirrels, Northern Flying Squirrels don’t gather and store much food for winter. Since they don’t hibernate and are active during the whole year, there is not as big a need as other squirrel species to cache food. But when temperatures do drop in winter, it’s common for many individual squirrels to come together to help each other stay warm!

 

It is rare to find these squirrels on the ground since they are incredibly clumsy walkers. If a predator approaches, they will typically try to hide instead of run away. Most of their time is spent at the tops of trees, gliding from branch to branch. Their average length of glides is between 16 – 82 feet (5 – 25 meters). I wish these squirrels could be seen during the day because watching them glide these distances would be incredible to see!

 


Which of these squirrels have you seen before in Utah?

 

Leave a comment below!

Leave a Reply