9 COMMON Birds Found in Liberia! (2024)

Are you trying to identify a bird found in Liberia?

Types of birds in Liberia

Some of the wildest and most colorful birds you could imagine are found here. From gigantic, flightless birds to colorful showstoppers, there’s something to catch everyone’s attention!

Due to the sheer number of species, there was no way to include every bird in Liberia in this article. So instead, I tried to focus on the birds that are most regularly seen and observed.

9 COMMON types of birds in Liberia!


#1. African Fish Eagle

  • Haliaeetus vocifer

Common Liberia birds

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Adults are 63–75 cm (25–29.5 in) long with a wingspan of 2.0-2.4 m (6.6-7.9 ft).
  • Their brown bodies contrast with black wings and a white face, chest, and legs. Their beaks and feet are bright yellow.
  • This species’ long talons are barbed to aid in picking up fish.

As the most popular bird in Liberia, this species is featured on flags of countries across the continent.

The African Fish Eagle symbolizes hope and freedom and is also known as the Screaming Eagle or the African Sea Eagle.

In addition to fish, they eat large birds, frogs, baby crocodiles, and carrion. They’re even known to eat monkeys! Typically, they perch on a branch, then dive down in a graceful swoop to grab their dinner. Additionally, they love to steal prey from other birds for an easy meal on the go.

The African Fish Eagle’s resoundingly clear call is sometimes known as The Spirit of Africa.

This remarkable bird is a habitat generalist, meaning it can live in most climates. Its only true requirement is a large body of water, like a lake or the ocean. So, other than the desert, you can expect to see this bird no matter where you are in Liberia!


#2. Helmeted Guinea Fowl

  • Numida meleagris

Common birds found in Liberia

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Adults grow up to 53-58 cm (21-23 in).
  • Their coloring is black with white spots. The legs are black, and the featherless head is bright blue with red on the face.
  • This species has a large, round body and a very small head and neck.

These chicken-like birds in Liberia are capable of flight but only do so when in danger.

Instead, they walk up to 10 kilometers (6 miles) daily in their quest for food. They’ll eat anything from small mammals and lizards to worms, insects, frogs, small snakes, snails, seeds, fruit, and spiders.

Outside breeding season, they form flocks of up to 24 birds and roost communally so they can alert each other to predators. They have an explosive take-off and only flap for short distances, gliding for longer flights. They prefer to flee from predators on land and can run 35 kph (22 mph) on land.

Helmeted Guineafowl have various calls, and some are more pleasant than others. For example, their whistling tune is much nicer on the ears than the raucous and irritating one found here.


#3. Hooded Vulture

  • Necrosyrtes monachus

Birds of Liberia

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Adults are 62–72 cm (24–28 in) long with a wingspan of 155–180 cm (61–71 in).
  • Their plumage is a uniform brown, with a featherless pinkish-white face and a grey-brown “hood” of short feathers.
  • This large vulture has an upright posture, large body, and small head, which are typical of its kind.

The Hooded Vulture is more mild-mannered than most other scavengers in Liberia.

As a result, it’s developed skills to make sure they can eat before more aggressive vultures chase it off from a carcass. It often arrives first, takes a small meal, and moves on, eating more frequently and in smaller portions.

Another way this species has adapted is to start visiting slaughterhouses and garbage dumps. Here, they take advantage of easy meals. The clever part is that the bigger, more aggressive vultures are not comfortable around humans, so Hooded Vultures avoid conflict.

Despite finding ways to adapt and survive, Hooded Vultures are still considered critically endangered. Often, when poachers kill big game, they remove the valuable parts and then poison the carcass with pesticides. These toxins kill any vultures that come to feed, so rangers won’t see vultures circling the carcasses, and the criminals have more time to get away.


#4. Little Bee-Eater

  • Merops pusillus

Types of birds in Liberia

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Adults are 15–17 cm (6-7 in.) long.
  • They have a green back, a bright yellow throat, and a black collar. Their bellies are a deeper brownish-yellow.
  • This species is slender and upright, with a pointed black beak.

Little Bee-eaters are the smallest species of African bee-eater. These birds are quite tame and friendly. They make practically no sound except for a quietly trilled “s-s-e-e-e-p.”

As their name implies, these little birds subsist on hornets, wasps, and bees. But, they’ve found an efficient way to avoid being stung by their favorite foods. Before they eat them, they smash their prey’s stinger into a hard surface several times to extract it.

Look for groups of Little Bee-eaters lined up, roosting communally on a branch. These tight-knit communities spend time together year-round. For example, a non-breeding pair will help feed chicks and even sit on the eggs to help out. Some nesters can have as many as five helpers raising the nestlings.


#5. Pied Crow

  • Corvus albus

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Adults are 46-52 cm (18-20 in) long.
  • Their coloring is completely black, except for the stark white “vest” between their wings and across their chest.

If you’ve ever wondered about the difference between a crow and a raven, studying the Pied Crow is a good way to learn! This bird in Liberia is considered a “link” between the two related families. It has the larger bill and long legs of a raven, as well as wider wings and a longer tail. However, its beak is small and straight like a crow’s, and it also has the typical “caw” call.

Pied Crows are often found near humans, but they don’t interact with people very much. They seem to like villages and towns, probably because of the abundance of food due to human refuse.

They are social and may congregate near an abundance of food but are generally found in pairs or small groups. Pied Crows eat reptiles and mammals, nestlings and eggs, insects and invertebrates, peanuts, grains, carrion, and human trash. If there is a slaughterhouse in the vicinity, you’ll almost certainly find them there, too.


#6. Pied Kingfisher

  • Ceryle rudis

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Adults grow to 25 cm (10 in) long.
  • Their coloring is white, with small black spots on the face, head, wings, tail, and shoulders.
  • This species has an extremely long and sharp beak.

Pied Kingfishers are the largest hovering bird in Liberia.

They often hover over a body of water, hunting until they spot a likely victim. Then, they drop vertically into the water, grab their prey, and leap out again. In addition, they often eat small prey in flight, allowing them to hunt small insects continuously without the need to return to shore.

Compared with other kingfishers, this species is gregarious and friendly. They often roost together in large groups at night. Pied Kingfishers are nearly always found close to large bodies of water.


#7. Village Weaver

  • Ploceus cucullatus

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Adults are 15–17 cm (6-7 in) long.
  • Males have a black face with a bright red eye, a bright yellow chest, a brown cowl down the back of the head, and splotchy black and yellow wings.
  • Females are largely yellow (including the head), with pale olive stripes on the upper parts and buff-yellow chest and underparts.

The Village Weaver has some of the most interesting nesting habits of any bird in Liberia.

For one, the nests themselves look like Christmas ornaments! They’re woven balls of grass and feathers that hang from the branches of trees. Additionally, male Village Weavers build the nests alone and defend them to attract a mate. Think of this as showing off your big, new house to your date!

Once a female chooses a nest (and a mate), she fills it with bedding and lays her eggs. Then, the male finds another mate and begins the process again! Despite having up to five broods at a time, the male Village Weaver contributes to the feeding and care of all his hatchlings.

These communal birds can be quite noisy, as they spend most of their time in their nests calling to one another.


#8. White-Throated Bee Eater

  • Merops albicollis

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Adults are 19–21 cm (7.5-8.5 in) long, with males gaining an additional 12 cm (5 in) from their tail streamers.
  • Look for this species’ white throat and white eyebrow on either side of its black eye stripe to differentiate it from other Bee Eaters.
  • Their coloring is bright green to white on the belly with a pale blue rump, a black collar underlined in turquoise, and bright yellow-orange on the back of the head.

White-throated Bee Eaters congregate in large groups, which protects them from predators. They also raise their young communally, sharing the duties of protecting nests and bringing food to nestlings.

Like others of their family, White-throated Bee Eaters eat hornets, wasps, and bees, catching them in mid-flight by leaping from a low perch. Before they eat them, however, they remove their prey’s stinger by jamming it into a hard surface several times to extract it. That’s a straightforward way to make sure your meal is safe to eat!

This species has a dry, high-pitched, rattling call.


#9. Woodland Kingfisher

  • Halcyon senegalensis

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Adults grow to 23 cm (9.1 in) long.
  • Its wings and back are electric blue, with black patches on the wings and a white chest and neck.
  • This species’ beak is large for its body, brilliant orange on top and black below.

The really interesting thing about kingfishers is you can instantly tell whether they live on fish or insects by the color of their beaks! As with the Woodland Kingfisher, orange beaks indicate an insect diet, and other colors like black or blue mean a fish-heavy diet.

Woodland Kingfishers are unusual because they can mimic other birds with the way they stand. When they squat and puff out their feathers, they tend to look like a sparrow, and if they stand taller, they are more like a robin. Females stand up tall more often to advertise to a potential mate. They also spread their wings wide to appear as large and colorful as possible.

The sound of their song is usually one sharp note, a pause, then about 20 trills of a descending note.


Do you need help identifying birds in Africa?

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Which of these birds in Liberia have you seen before?

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Check out these guides to other animals found in Liberia!

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