The 9 MOST Common Birds in Alaska! (2022)

What kinds of birds can you find in Alaska?

common birds in alaska

 

This question is hard to answer because of the vast number of birds found in Alaska. Did you know there have been over 475 species recorded here?

 

As you can imagine, there was no way to include this many birds in the below article. So instead, I tried to focus on the birds that are most regularly seen and observed.

 

Today, you will learn 9 types of birds COMMON in Alaska!

 

If you’re interested, you may be able to see some of the species listed below at my bird feeding station right now! I have a LIVE high-definition camera watching my feeders 24/7. 🙂

 

To learn more about birds in Alaska, check out my other guides!

 

9 Common Species of Birds That Live in Alaska:

  • The range maps below were generously shared with permission from The Birds of The World, published by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. I use their site OFTEN to learn new information about birds!

 


#1. American Robin

american robin - types of birds in alaska

Identifying Characteristics:

  • A beautiful thrush that features a rusty red breast and a dark head and back.
  • Look for a white throat and white splotches around the eyes.
  • Both sexes are similar, except that females appear paler.

 

American Robins are one of the most familiar birds in Alaska!

 

They inhabit a wide variety of habitats and naturally are found everywhere from forests to the tundra. But these thrushes are comfortable around people and are common to see in backyards.

 

American Robin Range Map

american robin range map

 

Even though they are abundant, American Robins rarely visit bird feeders because they don’t eat seeds. Instead, their diet consists of invertebrates (worms, insects, snails) and fruit. For example, I see robins frequently in my backyard, pulling up earthworms in the grass!

 

american robin eggs and nest

These birds also commonly nest near people. Look for an open cup-shaped nest that has 3-5 beautiful, distinctive sky blue color eggs.

 

American Robins sing a string of clear whistles, which is a familiar sound in spring. (Listen below)

Many people describe the sound as sounding like the bird is saying “cheerily, cheer up, cheer up, cheerily, cheer up.”

 


#2. Downy Woodpecker

species of birds in alaska

Identifying Characteristics:

  • These woodpeckers have a short bill and are relatively small.
  • Color-wise, they have white bellies, with a mostly black back that features streaks and spots of white.
  • Male birds have a distinctive red spot on the back of their head, which females lack.

 

 

Downy Woodpeckers are one of the most common birds in Alaska! You probably recognize them, as they are seen in most backyards.

 

Downy Woodpecker Range Map

 

 

Luckily, this woodpecker species is easy to attract to your backyard. The best foods to use are suet, sunflower seeds, and peanuts (including peanut butter). You may even spot them drinking sugar water from your hummingbird feeders! If you use suet products, make sure to use a specialized suet bird feeder.

 

What sounds do Downy Woodpeckers make?

Press PLAY above to hear a Downy Woodpecker!

 

Once you know what to listen for, my guess is that you will start hearing Downy Woodpeckers everywhere you go. Their calls resemble a high-pitched whinnying sound that descends in pitch towards the end.

 


#3. Hairy Woodpecker

kinds of birds in alaska

Identifying Characteristics:

 

  • Appearance-wise, Hairy Woodpeckers have striped heads and an erect, straight-backed posture while on trees.
  • Their bodies are black and white overall with a long, chisel-like bill.
  • Male birds can be identified by a red patch at the back of their heads, which females lack.

 

Hairy Woodpecker Range Map

 

Hairy Woodpeckers are common birds in Alaska in mature forests, suburban backyards, urban parks, swamps, orchards, and even cemeteries. Honestly, they can be found anywhere where large trees are abundant.

 

The most common call is a short, sharp “peek.This sound is similar to what a Downy Woodpecker makes, except it’s slightly lower in pitch. They also make a sharp rattling or whinny.

Hairy Woodpeckers can be a bit tricky to identify because they look almost identical to Downy Woodpeckers! These two birds are confusing to many people and present a problem when trying to figure out which one you’re observing.

 

Here are the THREE best ways to tell these species apart:

types of birds in alaska

 

Size:

  • Hairy’s are larger and measure 9 – 11 inches (23 – 28 cm) long, which is about the same size as an American Robin. A Downy is smaller and only measures 6 – 7 inches (15-18 cm) in length, which is slightly bigger than a House Sparrow.

Bill:

  • Looking at the size of their bills in relation to their head is my FAVORITE way to tell these woodpeckers apart. Downys have a tiny bill, which measures a bit less than half the length of their head, while Hairys have a bill that is almost the same size as their head.

Outer tail feathers:

  • If all else fails, then try to get a good look at their outer tail feathers. Hairys will be completely white, while Downys are spotted.

 


#4. Song Sparrow

song sparrow - birds in alaska

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Chest has brown streaks that converge onto a central breast spot.
  • Head has a brown crown with a grey stripe down the middle. Also, look for a grey eyebrow and cheek.
  • Back and body are mostly rust-brown with gray streaks throughout.

 

Sparrows can be incredibly difficult to identify, due to how many types of sparrows there are and the fact they look very similar. But luckily, Song Sparrows are one of the easier sparrow species to determine correctly.

 

Song Sparrow Range Map

song sparrow range map

These birds are common in Alaska, especially in wet, shrubby, and open areas.

 

Unlike other birds that nest in trees, Song Sparrows primarily nest in weeds and grasses. Many times you will find them nesting directly on the ground.

 

My favorite feature of Song Sparrows is their beautiful songs that can be heard across the continent. The typical one, which you can listen to below, consists of three short notes followed by a pretty trill. The song varies depending on location and the individual bird.

 


#5. Red-winged Blackbird

red winged blackbird

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Males are all black, except for a bright red and yellow patch on their shoulders.
  • Females are brown and heavily streaked. There is a bit of yellow around their bill.
  • Both sexes have a conical bill and are commonly seen sitting on cattails or perched high in a tree overlooking their territory.

 

Red-winged Blackbird Range Map

red winged blackbird range map

 

During the breeding season, these birds are almost exclusively found in marshes and other wet areas. Females build nests in between dense grass-like vegetation, such as cattails, sedges, and bulrushes. Males aggressively defend the nest against intruders, and I have even been attacked by Red-winged Blackbirds while walking near the swamp in my backyard!

 

When it’s the nonbreeding season, Red-winged Blackbirds spend much of their time in grasslands, farm fields, and pastures looking for weedy seeds to eat. It’s common for them to be found in large flocks that feature various other blackbird species, such as grackles, cowbirds, and starlings.

 

Red-winged Blackbirds are easy to identify by their sounds! (Press PLAY below)

If you visit a wetland or marsh in spring, you are almost guaranteed to hear males singing and displaying, trying to attract a mate. Listen for a rich, musical song, which lasts about one second and sounds like “conk-la-ree!

 


#6. European Starling

european starling

Identifying Characteristics:

  • A common bird in Alaska, they are about the size of an American Robin. Their plumage is black and appears to be shiny.
  • Short tail with a long slender beak.
  • Breeding adults are darker black and have a green-purple tint. In winter, starlings lose their glossiness, their beaks become darker, and they develop white spots over their bodies.

 

Did you know these birds are an invasive species and aren’t supposed to be in Alaska?

 

European Starling Range Map

starling range map

Back in 1890, one hundred starlings were brought over from Europe and released in New York City’s Central Park. The rest is history as starlings easily conquered the continent, along the way out-competing many of our beautiful native birds.

 

Their ability to adapt to human development and eat almost anything is uncanny to almost no other species.

 

keep starlings away from bird feeders

When starlings visit in small numbers, they are fun to watch and have beautiful plumage. Unfortunately, these aggressive birds can ruin a party quickly when they visit in massive flocks, chasing away all of the other birds while eating your expensive bird food. To keep these blackbirds away from your bird feeders, you will need to take extreme action and implement some proven strategies.

 

Starlings are impressive vocalists!

Listen for a mix of musical, squeaky, rasping notes. They are also known to imitate other birds.


#7. Rock Pigeon

kinds of pigeons in Alaska

Identifying Characteristics:

  • A plump bird with a small head, short legs, and a thin bill.
  • The typical pigeon has a gray back, a blue-grey head, and two black wing bars. But their plumage is highly variable, and it’s common to see varieties ranging from all-white to rusty-brown.

 

Rock Pigeons are extremely common birds in Alaska, but they are almost exclusively found in urban areas.

 

Rock Pigeon Range Map

pigeon range map
These birds are what everyone refers to as a “pigeon.” You have probably seen them gathering in huge flocks in city parks, hoping to get tossed some birdseed or leftover food.

 

Pigeons are easily attracted to bird feeders, especially if there is leftover food lying on the ground. Unfortunately, these birds can become a bit of a nuisance if they visit your backyard in high numbers. Many people find their presence overwhelming and look for ways to keep them away!

 

These birds are easy to identify by sound. My guess is that you will already recognize their soft, throaty coos. (Press PLAY below)

Love them or hate them, Rock Pigeons have been associated with humans for a long time! Some Egyptian hieroglyphics suggest that people started domesticating them over 5,000 years ago. And because of these facts, scientists aren’t even sure where their original range was.

 


#8. Black-capped Chickadee

black capped chickadee

 

Black-capped Chickadees are one of the most beloved birds in Alaska, and it’s easy to see why! These birds are often described as “cute,” as they are tiny, with an oversized head that features a black cap and bib.

 

Naturally, look for them in open deciduous forests, thickets, and cottonwood groves. They also adapt easily to the presence of people and are common to see in backyards and parks.

 

Black-capped Chickadee Range Map

black capped chickadee range map

 

Black-capped Chickadees are easy to attract to bird feeders!

 

In fact, once you set up a new bird feeder, they will likely be the first birds to visit, as they are curious about anything new in their territory. The best foods to use include sunflower, peanuts, and suet. Their small size and athletic ability mean these birds can use just about any type of feeder!

 

Try identifying Black-capped Chickadees by their sounds!

These birds are extremely vocal, and you should have no problem hearing one. And luckily, their vocalizations are unique and relatively easy to identify. Listen below to a song that is a simple 2 or 3 note whistle, which sounds like it’s saying “fee-bee” or “hey sweetie.”

Black-capped Chickadees also make a distinctive “chickadee-dee-dee” call. And yes, it actually sounds like they are saying their name! Interestingly, they add more “dee” notes onto the end of the call when alarmed.

 


#9: Rufous Hummingbird

rufous hummingbird

 

How To Identify:

  • Males: Bright copper-orange on their back (although some males have a green back) and sides of their belly. Beautiful reddish-orange iridescent throat. White breast and ear patch behind eye. Compared to other hummingbird species, they are small.

 

  • Females: They have a green crown, neck, and back. Rufous (copper) colored sides with a white breast and belly. Some females have a spot of red or orange on their throats.

 

Rufous Hummingbirds are one of the most aggressive types of birds in Alaska!

 

Be careful if one finds your hummingbird feeders or garden, as they will relentlessly attack and drive away other hummingbirds (including much larger species) away. They have even been seen chasing chipmunks!

Rufous Hummingbird Range Map

rufous hummingbird

 

Rufous Hummingbirds have an interesting migration pattern. In the spring, they fly north up the Pacific Coast to their summer breeding grounds. They return to their winter homes in Mexico and parts of the southern United States by flying a completely different route along the Rocky Mountains!

 

What sounds do Rufous Hummingbirds make?

The most common sound you will hear these birds make is a series of chipping notes, which are given as a warning to intruding birds. Males also make a chu-chu-chu” call at the bottom of a dive while trying to impress females.

 


Do you need help identifying or attracting birds?

Here are a few books and resources you can purchase that will assist!

 


Which of these birds have you seen before in Alaska?

 

Leave a comment below!

 

 

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