25 MOST Common Birds in Yukon! (2024)

What kinds of birds can you find in Yukon?

types of birds in Yukon

This question is hard to answer because of the vast number of birds found in Yukon. Did you know there have been over 1,000 species recorded here?

As you can imagine, there was no way to include this many birds in the below article. So instead, I tried to focus on the birds that are most regularly seen and observed.

25 COMMON birds in Yukon!

If you’re interested, you may be able to see some of the species listed below at my bird-feeding station right now! I have a LIVE high-definition camera watching my feeders 24/7. 🙂


#1. American Robin

  • Turdus migratorius

types of birds in Yukon

Identifying Characteristics:

  • A beautiful thrush that features a rusty red breast and a dark head and back.
  • Look for a white throat and white splotches around the eyes.
  • Both sexes are similar, except that females appear paler.

American Robins are one of the most familiar birds in Yukon!

They inhabit a wide variety of habitats and naturally are found everywhere from forests to the tundra. But these thrushes are comfortable around people and are common to see in backyards.

American Robin Range Map

american robin range map

Even though they are abundant, American Robins rarely visit bird feeders because they don’t eat seeds. Instead, their diet consists of invertebrates (worms, insects, snails) and fruit. For example, I see robins frequently in my backyard, pulling up earthworms in the grass!

american robin eggs and nest

These birds also commonly nest near people. Look for an open cup-shaped nest that has 3-5 beautiful, distinctive sky blue color eggs.

American Robins sing a string of clear whistles, which is a familiar sound in spring. (Listen below)

Many people describe the sound as sounding like the bird is saying “cheerily, cheer up, cheer up, cheerily, cheer up.”


#2. Downy Woodpecker

  • Dryobates pubescens

types of birds in Yukon

Identifying Characteristics:

  • These woodpeckers have a short bill and are relatively small.
  • Color-wise, they have white bellies, with a mostly black back that features streaks and spots of white.
  • Male birds have a distinctive red spot on the back of their head, which females lack.

Downy Woodpeckers are one of the most common birds in Yukon! You probably recognize them, as they are seen in most backyards.

Downy Woodpecker Range Map

Luckily, this woodpecker species is easy to attract to your backyard. The best foods to use are suet, sunflower seeds, and peanuts (including peanut butter). You may even spot them drinking sugar water from your hummingbird feeders! If you use suet products, make sure to use a specialized suet bird feeder.

What sounds do Downy Woodpeckers make? Press PLAY above to hear a Downy Woodpecker!

YouTube video

Once you know what to listen for, my guess is that you will start hearing Downy Woodpeckers everywhere you go. Their calls resemble a high-pitched whinnying sound that descends in pitch towards the end.


#3. Hairy Woodpecker

  • Leuconotopicus villosus

types of birds in Yukon

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Appearance-wise, Hairy Woodpeckers have striped heads and an erect, straight-backed posture while on trees.
  • Their bodies are black and white overall with a long, chisel-like bill.
  • Male birds can be identified by a red patch at the back of their heads, which females lack.

Hairy Woodpecker Range Map

Hairy Woodpeckers are common birds in Yukon in mature forests, suburban backyards, urban parks, swamps, orchards, and even cemeteries. Honestly, they can be found anywhere large trees are abundant.

The most common call is a short, sharp “peek.” This sound is similar to what a Downy Woodpecker makes, except it’s slightly lower in pitch. They also make a sharp rattling or whinny.

YouTube video

Hairy Woodpeckers can be a bit tricky to identify because they look almost identical to Downy Woodpeckers! These two birds are confusing to many people and present a problem when trying to figure out which one you’re observing.

Here are the THREE best ways to tell these species apart:

Size:

  • Hairy Woodpeckers are larger and measure 9 – 11 inches (23 – 28 cm) long, which is about the same size as an American Robin. A Downy is smaller and only measures 6 – 7 inches (15-18 cm) in length, which is slightly bigger than a House Sparrow.

Bill:

  • Looking at the size of their bills in relation to their head is my FAVORITE way to tell these woodpeckers apart. Downys have a tiny bill, which measures a bit less than half the length of their head, while Hairys have a bill that is almost the same size as their head.

Outer tail feathers:

  • If all else fails, then try to get a good look at their outer tail feathers. Hairys will be completely white, while Downys are spotted.

#4. House Sparrow

  • Passer domesticus

types of birds in Yukon

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Males have gray crowns, black bib, white cheeks, and chestnut on the sides of their faces and neck. Their backs are predominantly brown with black streaks.
  • Females are a dull brown color with streaks of black on their backs. Their underparts are light brown. This sparrow can be distinguished by the tan line that extends behind its eye.

House Sparrows are an invasive species (originally from the Middle East) and now one of the most abundant and widespread birds in Yukon (and the world)!

Range Map – House Sparrow

house sparrow range map

The House Sparrows compete with many native birds, such as bluebirds and Purple Martins, for nest cavities. Unfortunately, these invasive species tend to win more times than not.

In most urban and suburban areas it’s INCREDIBLY COMMON to see House Sparrows. They owe their success to their ability to adapt and live near humans. Unlike most other birds, they love grains and are commonly seen eating bread and popcorn at amusement parks, sporting events, etc. At your bird feeders, they especially love eating cracked corn, millet, and milo.

House Sparrows can be heard across the entire planet. In fact, pay attention the next time you’re watching the news in another country. Listen for a simple song that includes lots of “cheep” notes.

YouTube video

#5. American Crow

  • Corvus brachyrhynchos

american crow

Identifying Characteristics:

  • A large bird that is entirely black with an iridescent sheen.
  • Long black bill, black legs, and black feet.

American Crows are adaptable birds and are common in Yukon in almost every habitat.

American Crow Range Map

american crow range map

The list of places they can be found includes woodlands, fields, rivers, marshes, farms, parks, landfills, golf courses, cemeteries, and neighborhoods.

While they don’t come to feeders as often as other birds, there are a few foods that attract them consistently. Personally, the crows in my backyard LOVE peanuts, whether in the shell or out. Whole kernel corn and suet also seem to be consumed readily.

YouTube video

Can you count how many peanuts these crows fit in their mouth?

Believe it or not, American Crows are one of the smartest birds in Yukon.

For example, they can use tools, solve problems, and recognize human faces. It seems that crows even do things just for fun! Seriously, if you search the internet, it’s easy to find videos of them using round objects to sled down roofs.

American Crows have a large vocabulary. Listen for any number of caws, rattles, cackles, and clicks. The most common sound is a “caw-caw.” (Listen below)

YouTube video

#6. Song Sparrow

  • Melospiza melodia

Types of Sparrows that live in United States

Identifying Characteristics:

  • The chest has brown streaks that converge onto a central breast spot.
  • On their head, look for a brown crown with a gray stripe down the middle and a gray eyebrow and gray cheek.
  • The back and body are mostly rust-brown with gray streaks throughout.

These birds can be incredibly difficult to identify due to their abundance and how similar they all tend to look. But luckily, Song Sparrows are one of the easier sparrow species to identify correctly.

Song Sparrow Range Map

song sparrow range map

Song sparrows are common in Yukon, especially in wet, shrubby, and open areas.

Unlike other birds that nest in trees, Song Sparrows primarily nest in weeds and grasses. However, you’ll often find them nesting directly on the ground.

My favorite feature of Song Sparrows is their beautiful songs that can be heard across the continent. The typical one, which you can listen to below, consists of three short notes followed by a pretty trill. The song varies depending on location and the individual bird.

YouTube video

#7. Red-winged Blackbird

  • Agelaius phoeniceus

red winged blackbird

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Males are all black, except for a bright red and yellow patch on their shoulders.
  • Females are brown and heavily streaked. There is a bit of yellow around their bill.
  • Both sexes have a conical bill and are commonly seen sitting on cattails or perched high in a tree overlooking their territory.

Red-winged Blackbird Range Map

red winged blackbird range map

During the breeding season, these birds are almost exclusively found in marshes and other wet areas. Females build nests in between dense grass-like vegetation, such as cattails, sedges, and bulrushes. Males aggressively defend the nest against intruders, and I have even been attacked by Red-winged Blackbirds while walking near the swamp in my backyard!

When it’s the nonbreeding season, Red-winged Blackbirds spend much of their time in grasslands, farm fields, and pastures looking for weedy seeds to eat. It’s common for them to be found in large flocks that feature various other blackbird species, such as grackles, cowbirds, and starlings.

Red-winged Blackbirds are easy to identify by their sounds! (Press PLAY below)

If you visit a wetland or marsh in spring, you are almost guaranteed to hear males singing and displaying, trying to attract a mate. Listen for a rich, musical song that lasts about one second and sounds like “conk-la-ree!


#8. Brown-headed Cowbird

  • Molothrus after

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Look for a stocky, chunky bird with a thick, conical beak.
  • Males have black bodies with a brown head (hence the name). In poor light, it can be hard to tell that the head is brown.
  • Females are a plain brown color. There is slight streaking on the belly and a black eye.

Brown-headed cowbirds are one of the hardest birds to identify in Yukon!

Maybe it’s just me, but Brown-headed Cowbirds (especially females) always trip me up. I think it’s the fact that there just aren’t any features that stand out.

Brown-headed Cowbird Range Map

brown headed cowbird range map

Look for Brown-headed Cowbirds in grasslands, brushy thickets, prairies, and woodland edges. But they have greatly expanded their range due to human development, and they have adapted well to residential areas, pastures, orchards, and cemeteries. I see them in my suburban backyard quite often!

Cowbirds have a truly interesting way of reproducing they’re considered “brood parasites.” Instead of spending energy building nests and raising their young, they let other birds do it for them! Females deposit their eggs INSIDE the nests of other species, which means the “chosen” bird does all the hard work.

Interestingly, over 220 species have been identified as having hosted eggs, from small kinglets to large meadowlarks. The other birds typically don’t realize the deception and raise the baby cowbird to adulthood at the expense of their own hatchlings!


#9. Rock Pigeon

  • Columba livia

kinds of pigeons in the united states

Identifying Characteristics:

  • A plump bird with a small head, short legs, and a thin bill.
  • The typical pigeon has a gray back, a blue-grey head, and two black wing bars. But their plumage is highly variable, and it’s common to see varieties ranging from all-white to rusty-brown.

Rock Pigeons are extremely common birds in New York City, and they are almost exclusively found in urban areas.

Rock Pigeon Range Map

pigeon range map

These birds are what everyone refers to as a “pigeon.” You have probably seen them gathering in huge flocks in city parks, hoping to get tossed some birdseed or leftover food.
Pigeons are easily attracted to bird feeders, especially if there is leftover food lying on the ground. Unfortunately, these birds can become a bit of a nuisance if they visit your backyard in high numbers. Many people find their presence overwhelming and look for ways to keep them away!

These birds are easy to identify by sound. My guess is that you will already recognize their soft, throaty coos. (Press PLAY below)

Love them or hate them, Rock Pigeons have been associated with humans for a long time! Some Egyptian hieroglyphics suggest that people started domesticating them over 5,000 years ago. And because of these facts, scientists aren’t even sure where their original range was.


#10. Black-capped Chickadee

Types of chickadees found in United States

These tiny birds are one of the most beloved birds in Yukon, and it’s easy to see why! These birds are often described as “cute,” as they are tiny, with an oversized head that features a black cap and bib.

Black-capped Chickadee Range Map

black capped chickadee range map

Look for Black-capped Chickadees in Yukon in open deciduous forests, thickets, and cottonwood groves. They also adapt easily to the presence of people and are common to see in backyards and parks.

These birds are extremely vocal, and you should have no problem hearing one. And luckily, their vocalizations are unique and relatively easy to identify. (Press PLAY below!)

Black-capped Chickadees are incredibly easy to attract to bird feeders! In fact, once you set up a new bird feeder, they will likely be the first birds to visit, as they are curious about anything new in their territory. The best foods to use include sunflower, peanuts, and suet. Their small size and athletic ability mean these birds can use just about any type of feeder!

YouTube video

#11. Pileated Woodpecker

  • Dryocopus pileatus

There are not many birds that will make you stop what you’re doing quite like a Pileated Woodpecker. These birds are HUGE, and adults can be up to 19 inches (48 cm) long and have a wingspan of 30 inches (76 cm)! For reference, this is about the size of a crow.

In addition to their large size, these birds are mostly black but with white stripes on their face and neck. Look for a large triangle red crest on the top of their heads. Males have a red stripe on their cheek, where the stripe is black on females.

Pileated Woodpecker Range Map

Pileated Woodpeckers are common birds in Yukon in large, mature forests with lots of dead and fallen trees. They rely on rotting wood consisting of ants, wood-boring beetles, and termites to find food. Additionally, they will supplement their diet with fruits and nuts.

YouTube video

These birds are quite vocal, and you should have no problem hearing one. Listen for a loud “cuk-cuk-cuk-cuk-cuk,” which rises and falls in pitch and volume.

Incredibly, Pileated Woodpeckers will visit bird feeders! Yes, it’s possible to attract these stunning birds to your backyard. They are most often seen dining on suet. The below video was taken from my bird feeding station!

YouTube video

#12. Rufous Hummingbird

rufous hummingbird

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Males: Bright copper-orange on their back (although some males have a green back) and sides of their belly. Beautiful reddish-orange iridescent throat. White breast and ear patch behind eye. Compared to other hummingbird species, they are small.
  • Females: They have a green crown, neck, and back. Rufous (copper) colored sides with a white breast and belly. Some females have a spot of red or orange on their throat.

Rufous Hummingbirds have an interesting migration pattern. In the spring, they fly north up the Pacific Coast to their summer breeding grounds. They return to their winter homes in Mexico and parts of the southern United States by flying a completely different route along the Rocky Mountains!

Rufous Hummingbird Range Map

rufous hummingbird

Be careful if one finds your hummingbird feeders or garden, as these aggressive hummers will relentlessly attack and drive away other hummingbirds (including much larger species) away. They have even been seen chasing chipmunks!

If an aggressive Rufous Hummingbird has taken over your hummingbird feeder, you have a few options to help alleviate the pressure. My favorite strategy is setting up multiple feeders around your entire yard. The farther you can place them apart, the better! There is no way your problem bird can defend all the feeding stations at once, ensuring that other individuals get a chance to eat. 🙂

The most common sound you will hear these birds make is a series of chipping notes, which are given as a warning to intruding birds. Males also make a “chu-chu-chu” call at the bottom of a dive while trying to impress females.


#13. Chipping Sparrow

  • Spizella passerina

chipping sparrow pic

Identifying characteristics:

  • Some are brightly colored with a rusty crown, grayish belly, and a black-streaked eyeline.
  • Others are paler with a brownish crown, grayish belly, and an unstreaked neck and belly.
  • Both sexes are slim with a long tail and medium-sized bill.

Chipping Sparrows are common across Yukon.

Luckily, they’re easy to identify, thanks to their rust-colored crown. You’ll often see them at backyard feeding stations, eating black oil sunflower seeds and other seed mixes on the ground.

Chipping Sparrow Range Map

chipping sparrow range map

Look for them in the woods by grassy meadows. These sparrows are also common in suburban areas!

Chipping Sparrows have loud, trilling songs among the most common sounds of spring woodlands and suburbs. Their songs are long trill notes that they repeat over and over, almost sounding mechanical. Listen below!

YouTube video

#14. Dark-eyed Junco

  • Junco hyemalis

Identifying characteristics:

  • Smooth and soft-looking slate gray with a white belly.
  • Small pale bill, long tail with white outer feathers.
  • Dark-eyed Juncos have various color patterns depending on the region. So one by you could look different than the pictures above.

Dark-eyed Juncos are one of the most common birds in Yukon. A recent estimate sets their population around 630 million.

You can easily identify these sparrows by how smooth their feathers look. It appears like they would be as soft as a chinchilla to touch.

Dark-eyed Junco Range Map

dark eyed junco range map

This species is found in pine and mixed-coniferous forests when they breed, but in winter, they are in fields, parks, woodlands, and backyards.

Dark-eyed Juncos like to visit feeders in the winter, but ONLY ON THE GROUND, where they consume fallen seeds.

Males sing a two-second loud musical trilling song that can carry over hundreds of feet away. In addition, both sexes also sing softer songs that are a mixture of warbles, trills, and whistles.

YouTube video

#15. Pine Siskin

  • Spinus pinus

Common United States Finches

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Both sexes are small, brown, and streaked with fine yellow edging on their wings and tails.
  • Sharply pointed bill and a short, forked tail and long pointed wingtips.
  • The only finch in Yukon where males and females look the same.

Pine Siskins are social and search for food in flocks while chirping nonstop to each other. They don’t even stop chattering when flying!

Pine Siskin Range Map

pine siskin range key

Pine Siskins feed at backyard feeders generally in the winter. They prefer to eat smaller seeds without tough shells, such as sunflower or Nyjer seeds.

Pine Siskins are typically found in mixed evergreen or deciduous forests, but they will move to a new place in search of food, like weedy fields, backyards, or gardens.

Listen below to Pine Siskin’s song, a twittering warble that rises and falls in pitch. They randomly throw in a “ZZZzzzzzreeee” that rises in pitch ever so often. You will notice they sound more wheezy than other finches in Yukon.

YouTube video

#16. Rose-breasted Grosbeak

  • Pheucticus ludovicianus

Red-breasted Grosbeak male and female

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Stocky birds with a large, trianglar bill. About the size of an American Robin.
  • Males have black backs and wings, with a distinctive red mark on their white breast.
  • Females are heavily streaked with a white eyebrow and a pale bill.

It’s easy to see how these beautiful finches got their name. One look at the males, and you’ll immediately notice the bright red plumage topping their white breasts. On the other hand, females can be hard to identify, as they look similar to many other birds.

Rose-breasted Grosbeaks like to visit bird feeders, where it uses its huge triangular bill to crack open seeds. I’ve never seen one of these finches use a tube feeder; I don’t think the perches provide enough space for them. If you want to attract them, the best food to use is sunflower seeds set out on a platform feeder.

Rose-breasted Grosbeak Range Map

Rose-breasted Grosbeak males sing to establish territories and attract females. When the female shows up, the male sometimes plays hard-to-get, rejecting her for a day or two before finally accepting her as a mate! To make up for this, they give the female a break and sit on the nest to keep the eggs warm.

Rose-breasted Grosbeaks are known for their beautiful song. It sounds similar to an American Robin but better! Listen for a long series of notes that rise and fall. If you hear one, make sure to look for the male singing from an elevated perch.

YouTube video

#17. White-crowned Sparrow

  • Zonotrichia leucophrys

White-crowned Sparrow pic

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Both sexes can be grayish or brownish with a long tail.
  • On their head, they can have black and white stripes or brown and tan. The head is peaked on the crown.
  • Bills are orangish-yellow or pinkish.

White-crowned Sparrows are found in shrubbery habitats with open grassy areas in the breeding season. In winter, they prefer weedy fields, thickets, and backyards.

White-crowned Sparrow Range Map

white crowned sparrow range map

If you want to attract these sparrows to your backyard, use sunflower seeds. Just make sure the food is placed on the ground, as they won’t fly up to feeders. and having a brush pile will entice them to stay.

White-crowned Sparrows are known for their long migration journeys. This sparrow has been known to travel over 300 miles in one night.

Males primarily sing, but females on occasion will too. Their song lasts only a few seconds. Listen below.

YouTube video

#18. White-throated Sparrow

  • Zonotrichia albicollis

white throated sparrow pic

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Both sexes’ colors can vary; some can be more grayish or tannish on their chunky body.
  • Head is typically black and white striped with a yellow spot between the eyes.
  • White throat patch, gray face, and small bill.

Look for these sparrows in the woods on the forest edge. They enjoy scratching at the ground under leaves or picking leaves up and moving them out of the way with their bill.

White-throated Sparrow Range Map

white throated sparrow range map

This species readily visits bird feeders, especially in winter. Feed them sunflower seeds or millet and make sure some of the food ends up on the ground, as they won’t fly up to feeders. Luckily, I see these birds often at my feeding station! And having a place for them to hide and find shelter will entice them to stay.

To attract them to your backyard, use black oil sunflower seeds and millet in the winter.

White-throated Sparrows sing a high-pitched whistle that is easy to learn. Just listen for “Oh-sweet-Canada-Canada.

YouTube video

#19. Gray Catbird

  • Dumetella carolinensis

gray catbird

Identifying Characteristics:

  • They are completely grey overall, except for their black cap.

Gray Catbirds are incredible vocalists who mimic the songs of many other birds!

And luckily, their most common call is incredibly easy to identify. Listen for a raspy, cat-like “meow,” which is how they got their name! Seriously, if you hear a noise that sounds like a cat in a dense thicket, you are likely listening to a Gray Catbird.

Gray Catbird Range Map

grey catbird range map

These completely gray birds will also visit bird feeders in Yukon. The secret is grape jelly! Yes, you read that correctly. Gray Catbirds regularly visit my feeding station when I set out small cups of grape jelly (primarily used to attract orioles).


#20. Red-breasted Nuthatch

  • Sitta canadensis

species of nuthatches

Red-breasted Nuthatches are active little songbirds that have beautiful coloring. Look for compact birds that have almost no neck and a very short tail.

They have a black crown and two distinctive eyelines, one which is white and the other black. Lastly, their back is a gorgeous blue-gray, while the belly features a cinnamon coloring. Both sexes look the same, except that females have duller heads and paler underparts.

Red-breasted Nuthatch Range Map

These small nuthatches breed in northern North America, the western mountains, and the upper northeast. But during winter, they can truly show up almost anywhere. These birds travel where needed to make sure they have enough food. In some years, they have been seen as far south as the Gulf of Mexico and Northern Mexico!

Red-breasted Nuthatches are mostly found in Yukon in coniferous forests. Their preferred habitat contrasts sharply to White-breasted Nuthatches, who prefer living in deciduous forests.

Red-breasted Nuthatches are common visitors to bird feeders!

YouTube video

To attract these energetic birds, just put out a fresh supply of sunflower seeds, peanuts, and suet! Because of their acrobatic ability and small size, they can use almost every type of bird feeder.

Have you ever heard a tin horn while in the woods?

If so, you were probably listening to a Red-breasted Nuthatch! These birds make a fast series of nasally “yank-yank-yank” sounds, which have been compared to the sound that a toy tin horn makes. These calls are typically made by males that are still looking for a mate.

Lastly, they have a unique way of defending their nest cavity from predators. Both males and females apply conifer tree resin to the entrance hole. This extremely sticky substance is thought to help keep predators from entering!


#21. Common Raven

  • Corvus corax

common raven

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Large bird that is completely black, including its eyes and bill.
  • The bill is hefty and thick.
  • In flight, look for their wedge-shaped tail.

Ravens are one of the SMARTEST birds in Yukon!

For example, one study has shown that these corvids are drawn to gunshots during hunting season to investigate the carcass but ignore other loud noises that don’t lead to food, such as air horns or car alarms.

Their intelligence makes them efficient predators, and it’s common for ravens to team up to get food, such as stealing eggs from nests or attacking larger prey like newly born lambs.

Common Raven Range Map

Since they are so smart and adaptable, Common Ravens are found in many habitats in Yukon. Look for them living near the edges of towns, especially in landfills that supply an endless amount of food. But ravens also have no problem living far away from civilization.

Common Ravens are impressive vocalists that make many different types of calls, from harsh grating calls to shrill alarm sounds. But the most common sound you will hear in the wild is a gurgling croak that rises in pitch.

Interestingly, they can mimic the sounds of many other bird species and even humans if raised in captivity.


#22. Black-billed Magpie

  • Pica hudsonia

large black and white birds in the united states

Identifying Characteristics:

  • A large black and white bird with a long tail.
  • In the right light, you can see beautiful blue iridescent feathers on the wings and tail.

It’s hard to miss these bold corvids in the western United States!

Black-billed Magpies demand your attention. They are very social, noisy, and comfortable living amongst people and are commonly seen in smaller towns. Naturally, they live in open grasslands and plains and tend to avoid dense forests.

Black-billed Magpie Range Map

Being part of the Corvid family, Black-billed Magpies are incredibly intelligent. One interesting behavior is that they seem to have funerals when they discover a deceased magpie. Individual birds will begin calling loudly to attract more magpies, eventually having as many as 40 birds gathered for 10-15 minutes before flying away silently.


#23. Mountain Bluebird

  • Sialia currucoides

mountain bluebird

There are not many things more beautiful than seeing a Mountain Bluebird while hiking in the mountains. 🙂

It’s hard to mistake a Mountain Bluebird if you see one, especially the males, as they are covered with beautiful sky-blue feathers on their head, back, and wings. Females are a bit trickier since they are mostly gray-brown, with tinges of blue on their tail and wings.

Mountain Bluebird Range Map

mountain bluebird range map

In the western United States, look for these bluebirds in open areas.

As their name suggests, Mountain Bluebirds are observed at elevations up to 12,500 feet during the breeding season. Once winter arrives, they typically fly down to lower elevations.

These birds are found in open areas, such as meadows, prairies, or pastures. They also enjoy habitat with a mix of grasses, shrubs, and trees, such as open woodlands, burned areas, or places that have had the forests thinned by logging.

mountain bluebird flying after insects

Mountain Bluebirds feast on insects during warm months and switch their diet to mostly berries in winter. But unlike other bluebird species, they are excellent aerial hunters and routinely grab insects out of midair!

Try attracting Mountain Bluebirds with nest boxes!

common bluebirds in the united states

These birds take readily to human-made nest boxes. Providing bluebirds with a suitable house is extremely helpful to them but also enjoyable for humans to watch!

Competition for nesting cavities is fierce for Mountain Bluebirds. Not only do they have to compete with each other, but also with Western Bluebirds, European Starlings, House Sparrows, House Wrens, and Tree Swallows.

In fact, finding a suitable nesting location is so important for female Mountain Bluebirds, they rarely care about anything else. She chooses her mate almost solely based on the quality of his nesting cavity, ignoring things like looks, singing skills, and flying ability!


#24. Steller’s Jay

  • Cyanocitta stelleri

steller's jay pic

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Larger bird with a black head, rounded wings, and a long tail.
  • A tall black crest on the crown of the head helps identify them.
  • Both sexes are half black and half blue on their wings, belly, and tail.

You will find this bold corvid in evergreen forests in the western United States. Steller’s Jays often visit parks, campgrounds, and picnic areas.

Steller’s Jay Range Map

stellers jay range map

This jay species is very intelligent, bold, and noisy. You can attract them to your feeders by providing peanuts, larger seeds, and suet.

Steller’s Jays are often nest robbers. They have even been known to attack or kill small adult birds like nuthatches or juncos.

Males and sometimes females have calls that sound like “shaack, shaack, shaack,” shooka, shooka.” Listen below.


#25. Northern Flicker

  • Colaptes auratus

Northern Flickers are wonderfully handsome and relatively common in Yukon.

They are about the size of an American Robin and feature a black bib and spotted belly. But, depending on your location, these woodpeckers appear different. There are two distinct variations you should watch for:

Variation #1: Yellow-shafted

This sub-species is mostly found in the eastern half of North America. These birds are characterized by red on the back of their head and yellow feathers on their underwing and tail that are visible in flight. Males also have a BLACK mustache stripe, which females lack.

Variation #2: Red-shafted

This variety is found in the west. To correctly identify, look for a RED mustache stripe, which is found on both sexes. Also, when they are in flight, you can clearly see red-orange feathers on their underwing and tail. Red-shafted Northern Flickers also have a mostly gray face with a brown crown, whereas the Yellow-shafted variety has a brown face and gray crown.

And here is the most confusing part: Where these two varieties of Northern Flickers overlap, they breed with each other! Not surprisingly, these hybrids have a mixture of both features.

Northern Flicker Range Map

To find a Northern Flicker, you should look on the ground! These birds are unique and don’t act like typical woodpeckers. They spend a lot of time searching for ants and beetles on the forest floor by digging through the dirt! They hammer away at the soil just like other woodpeckers drill into trees.

Northern Flickers are fairly easy to identify by sound! Listen for a loud ringing call that sounds like a piercing “wicka-wicka-wicka.”


To learn more about other birds that live near you, check out these guides!


Which of these birds have you seen before in Yukon?

Leave a comment below!

The range maps above were generously shared with permission from Birds of the World, published by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. I use their site OFTEN to learn new information about birds!

 

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