4 Types of DUCKS That Live in Bosnia and Herzegovina! (2024)

Do you want to learn about the types of ducks found in Bosnia and Herzegovina?

Types of ducks in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Well, you’ve come to the right place. As you will see, there are all kinds of colorful, beautiful, and odd-looking ducks here!

In this article, you will find descriptions, photos, and RANGE MAPS for each species. I’ve also included some fun facts about these incredible water birds. 🙂

4 types of ducks in Bosnia and Herzegovina!


#1. Mallard

  • Anas platyrhynchos

Common Bosnia and Herzegovina ducks

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Males have a bright green head, thin white collar, dark reddish-brown chest, yellow bill, and a black rump with a white-tipped tail.
  • Females are mottled brown with orange and brown bills.
  • Both sexes have purple-blue secondary feathers on their wings, most visible when standing or flying.

My guess is that almost everyone is familiar with the Mallard. These ducks are the most common species in Bosnia and Herzegovina!

Mallards are extremely comfortable around people, which is why these adaptable ducks are widespread. They are found in virtually any wetland habitat, regardless of location.

Mallards readily accept artificial structures built for them by humans. If you have a nice pond or a marsh, feel free to put up a homemade nesting area to enjoy some adorable ducklings walking around your property! Make sure you put up predator guards so predators can’t get to the eggs.

When you think of a duck quacking, it is almost inevitably a female Mallard. If there is a better duck sound, we haven’t heard it! Interestingly, males do not quack like females but, instead, make a raspy call.

YouTube video

#2. Common Merganser

  • Mergus merganser

Common ducks found in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Identifying Characteristics:

  • This fairly large duck has a long, slender orange bill with a black tip and dark eyes.
  • Breeding males have a largely white body, a black back, and a mallard-like green head.
  • Females and nonbreeding males sport cinnamon-colored heads and grayish-white bodies.

Due to their thin bill, Common Mergansers stand out fairly easily from most other ducks in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Their favorite food is fish, which they catch with the help of their serrated bill, but they also indulge in aquatic invertebrates such as crustaceans, mollusks, insects, and worms.

Common Mergansers are so good at fishing that many other ducks try to steal from them when they surface. It’s common to see flocks of seagulls following them, hoping to snatch an easy meal. Even Bald Eagles have been known to rob them of their hard-earned fish!

Naturally, these ducks nest in tree cavities that woodpeckers have carved out. Interestingly, newborn ducklings are only about a day old when they leap from the entrance to the ground, at which point the mother will lead them to water. Then, they hop into the water and immediately catch their own food. It’s a steep learning curve, but these ducklings are up for the challenge!


#3. Muscovy Duck

  • Cairina moschata

Ducks of Bosnia and Herzegovina

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Both sexes are black and white, but the pattern of color is highly variable. Adults have bare skin on their faces, which looks like a pink mask. Their bills can be yellow, pink, black, or a combination of these colors.
  • Males’ black feathers are iridescent, giving off a greenish sheen in the sunlight.
  • Females lack the green tint and are usually more drab looking.

Identifying the Muscovy Duck can be challenging because this domesticated breed has many color variations. The easiest way to tell if you’ve seen this species is by its size since it’s larger than other ducks in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Muscovy Ducks are native to South America, where they’ve been domesticated since the pre-Columbian era by Native Americans. They are bred primarily as a food source. They were originally brought to Bosnia and Herzegovina as farming stock, but some Muscovy Ducks escaped and established feral colonies in the wild. Interestingly, this breed is the ONLY domesticated duck that isn’t a descendant of the Mallard!

Today, there are feral populations of Muscovy Ducks found all over the world. In combination with wild subspecies, it’s one of the most widespread ducks. Their tolerance for cold weather and human presence makes them the perfect species for population growth, even outside their natural habitat. Look for Muscovy Ducks alongside lakes, rivers, and ponds in populated areas.


#4. Red-crested Pochard

  • Netta rufina

Types of ducks in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Males have bright red bills and eyes, a chestnut head, and brown, black, and white bodies.
  • Females are a soft, dusty brown with a pale gray neck and a black bill with a red-orange tip.

Like other diving ducks in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Red-crested Pochard is highly social and forms large flocks.

You’re likely to find them in lowland marshes, where they spend their time in the water and among low vegetation. Some populations are year-round residents, although northern ducks migrate south for the winter.

Red-crested Pochards are comfortable around people and often make their homes in city parks! However, they stay near water, so parks with rivers or lakes are always the best place to look.

Did you know that bread isn’t good for ducks? Even though many people feed ducks stale bread, it’s hard for them to digest. Instead of bread, crackers, or table scraps, try feeding ducks cracked corn, oats, rice, birdseed, frozen peas, chopped lettuce, or sliced grapes. Ducks, including Red-crested Pochards, will be grateful!

You can also listen for this duck’s distinctive call. Males make a wheezy “veht” while females give a series of rasping “vrah-vrah-vrah” noises.

YouTube video

Do you need more help identifying ducks in Europe?

These titles will provide you with more information!


Which of these ducks in Bosnia and Herzegovina have you seen before?

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Check out these guides to other animals found in Bosnia and Herzegovina!

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