3 Types of PURPLE Birds Found in Alaska!

Did you recently see a mystery PURPLE bird in Alaska?

Types of purple birds in Alaska

If so, I’m guessing you are trying to identify the species correctly!

 

Well, you’re in the right place. Below, you will learn about the different PURPLE birds in Alaska. I’ve included high-quality pictures and range maps to help you!

 

Fortunately, many of the purple birds listed below visit bird feeders, so you have a great chance of attracting them to your yard. If you’re incredibly fortunate, you may even see one at my bird feeding station right now! I have a LIVE high-definition camera watching my bird feeders 24/7. 🙂

 

3 PURPLE birds that live in Alaska:

*Please note that purple is not a common color for birds. As you will see, many birds below only have a patch of purple feathers. In addition, some of the species have iridescent feathers, which means they ONLY appear purple when the sun is shining on them.*

 


#1. European Starling

  • Sturnus vulgaris

Birds that are purple in Alaska

Identifying Characteristics:

  • A common purple bird in Alaska. Their plumage appears shiny in the sun, which is when you see the purple sheen.
  • Breeding adults are darker black and have a green-purple tint. In winter, starlings lose their glossiness, their beaks become darker, and they develop white spots over their bodies.

 

Did you know these purplish birds are an invasive species and aren’t supposed to be in Alaska?

 

In 1890, one hundred starlings were brought over from Europe and released in New York City’s Central Park. The rest is history as starlings easily conquered the continent, along the way out-competing many native birds. Their ability to adapt to human development and eat almost anything is uncanny to almost no other species.

European Starling Range Map

starling range map

 

When starlings visit in small numbers, they are fun to watch and have beautiful plumage. But unfortunately, these aggressive birds can ruin a party quickly when they visit in massive flocks, chasing away all the other birds while eating your expensive bird food. To keep these blackbirds away from your bird feeders, you must take extreme action and implement “anti-starling” strategies.

 


#2. Rock Pigeon

  • Columba livia

Alaska purple birds

Rock Pigeons are extremely common in Alaska, but they are almost exclusively found in urban areas. These birds are what everyone refers to as a “pigeon.” You have probably seen them gathering in huge flocks in city parks, hoping to get tossed some birdseed or leftover food.

 

The typical pigeon has a gray back, a blue-grey head, and two black wing bars. In addition, look for a purple iridescence around their necks!

Rock Pigeon Range Map

pigeon range map

 

Pigeons are easily attracted to bird feeders, especially if leftover food is on the ground. Unfortunately, these purplish birds can become a nuisance if they visit your backyard in high numbers. Many people find their presence overwhelming and look for ways to keep them away!

 

Love them or hate them, Rock Pigeons have been associated with humans for a long time! Some Egyptian hieroglyphics suggest that people started domesticating them over 5,000 years ago. But, interestingly, scientists aren’t even sure where their original range occurs!

 


#3. Violet-green Swallow

  • Tachycineta thalassina

purple birds in Alaska

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Sleek-looking birds with a slightly forked tail and long wings.
  • Greenish back with white cheeks and white underparts.
  • An iridescent purple or violet rump.

 

At first glance, these swallows appear dark. But once the sun hits their feathers, you can truly appreciate their beauty, as their metallic green backs and purple behinds become visible.

 

Your best chance at seeing these green and purple birds in Alaska is usually over open water. Violet-green Swallows will fly over lakes, ponds, or rivers in the early mornings, hunting for insects. Since they tend to flock with other species of swifts and swallows, look for the birds with a white belly and cheeks.

Violet-green Swallow Range Map

violet green swallow range map

Violet-green Swallows spend winters in Mexico and Central America and are only in North America during the breeding season. If your house sits on land with open woodlands near a water source, it’s entirely possible to have these birds raise their young in your yard. The best way to attract a nesting pair is to hang up nesting boxes 9-15 feet above the ground.

 


Which of these PURPLE birds have you seen before in Alaska?

 

Leave a COMMENT below. Make sure you tell us WHERE you saw the bird. 🙂