2 Types of Snakes Found on St. Croix (2024)

Below you will learn about the types of snakes found in St. Croix.

Because of the geographic isolation of the islands, there are not as many snake species as you might expect here.

2 SNAKES that live in St. Croix:


#1. Boa Constrictor

  • Boa constrictor

Also known as Red-tailed Boa, Common Boa.

snakes in st. croix

Identifying Characteristics:

  • These snakes grow 400 cm (157 in) long on average.
  • Females are longer and wider than males.
  • Coloration depends on their habitat. They can be shades of tan, brown, green, and even yellow or red.
  • They have distinctive geometric patterns with ovals, diamonds, bands, and stripes.

The Boa Constrictor is so famous it doesn’t need a common name! Instead, people easily remember it by its scientific name, Boa Constrictor! Hailing from the humid tropics, this heavyweight snake can be spotted in trees and burrows in St. Croix.

Don’t let its large size fool you! The Boa Constrictor is an ambush predator that can strike with blinding speed. This snake is also a remarkable swimmer, so don’t be surprised to find one near a river or stream.

Boa Constrictors are a popular attraction in zoos all over the world. In captivity, they can live for over 40 years. They’re generally docile, but they’ll still deliver a warning bite if they feel threatened. Thankfully, they’re non-venomous.


#2. Brahminy Blindsnake

  • Indotyphlops braminus

snakes in st. croix

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Adults are 5.1-10.2 cm (2-4 in) long.
  • Their coloring varies; charcoal gray, light yellow-beige, silver-gray, purplish, and white are common.
  • The body shape is worm-like, and they are easily mistaken for earthworms.

You will probably never see these small snakes in St. Croix.

They spend almost all their time underground in ant and termite nests and live under logs, moist leaves, and stones. Look for them in urban gardens and moist forests.

The Brahminy Blindsnake, as its name suggests, is almost completely blind. It has small, translucent eyes that can detect light but not form images. This snake species is not native to St. Croix. Instead, it arrived here by being transported in the soil of potted plants, which has earned them the nickname “Flowerpot Snake.”

When distressed or attacked, the Brahminy Blindsnake will try to escape underground. If touched, it might press its tail on the attacker and release a smelly musk. Despite its rather creepy appearance, this snake is completely harmless to humans.


Which of these snakes have you seen before in St. Croix?

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