8 Birds That Are WHITE in Maine! (ID Guide) –

Did you recently see a mystery WHITE bird in Maine?

Types of white birds in Maine

If so, I’m guessing you are trying to figure out how to identify the species correctly!

 

Well, you’re in the right place. Below, you will learn about the different WHITE birds found in Maine. I’ve included high-quality pictures and range maps to help you!

 

But before you begin, let me give you one warning:

 

Trying to figure out which WHITE bird you saw can be difficult. The reason is that you may have seen a bird affected by either of these two conditions:

Birds that are white in Maine

  • Albinism: This happens when cells can’t produce ANY melanin, which is the pigment that provides color to feathers.
  • Leucism: This condition only involves a PARTIAL loss of pigmentation. Instead of being completely white, the bird may be duller in color or have irregular patches of white plumage.

 

The list below focuses ONLY on NATURALLY white birds found in Maine.

 


#1. Snowy Owl

  • Bubo scandiacus

Maine white birds

 

Snowy Owls are arguably the most stunning white bird you will see in Maine!

 

Their white plumage stops almost everyone in their tracks, both birders and non-birders alike! Although they are mostly white, they have horizontal dark lines over most of their bodies. Interestingly, similar to humans, individuals seem to get whiter with age. 🙂

Snowy Owl Range Map

snowy owl range map

 

Snowy Owls migrate with the changing seasons. During summer, they mate and breed in northern North America on the tundra. But when winter arrives, these birds come south.

 

You never know how far south Snowy Owls will travel.

 

Most years, Snowy Owls only appear as far down as the northern USA. But some years, there is an “irruption” of Snowy Owls, and many more birds than normal migrate south.

 


#2. Rock Pigeon

  • Columba livia

white birds in Maine

Rock Pigeons are extremely common, but they are almost exclusively found in urban areas. These birds are what everyone refers to as a “pigeon.” You have probably seen them gathering in huge flocks in city parks, hoping to get tossed some birdseed or leftover food.

 

The typical pigeon has a gray back, a blue-grey head, and two black wing bars. But their plumage is highly variable, and it’s common to see completely white birds in Maine.

Rock Pigeon Range Map

pigeon range map

 

Pigeons are easily attracted to bird feeders, especially if leftover food is lying on the ground. Unfortunately, these birds can become a nuisance if they visit your backyard in high numbers. Many people find their presence overwhelming and look for ways to keep them away!

 

Love them or hate them, Rock Pigeons have been associated with humans for a long time! Some Egyptian hieroglyphics suggest that people started domesticating them over 5,000 years ago. But, interestingly, scientists aren’t even sure where their original range occurs!

 


#3. Snow Bunting

  • Plectrophenax nivalis

Types of white birds in Maine

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Round bodied with a short thick conical bill.
  • Breeding males are almost all white, with black on the back.
  • Females and non-breeding males are white but have brown-streaked backs and brownish heads.

 

These charming white birds are a delight to see in Maine!

 

But since Snow Buntings choose frigid locations high in the Arctic to breed, your best chance to find them is in winter in open fields along the roadside.

Snow Bunting Range Map

snow bunting range map

 

Even in summer, Snow Buntings have to work hard to keep their hatchlings warm enough to survive. They build their nests in the deep cracks of rocks and use a thick fur lining to protect the eggs. They never really leave the nest, ensuring it stays warm, and the male comes and feeds the mother every fifteen minutes.

 


#4. Ring-Billed Gull

  • Larus delawarensis

kinds of white birds

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Adults range from 16.9 to 21.3 inches in length and have a wingspan of 41.3 and 46.1 inches.
  • Breeding adults are clean gray above with a white head, white body, white tail, and black wingtips spotted with white.
  • They have yellow legs, eyes, and bill with a black band.

 

Look for these white birds in Maine near aquatic habitats.

 

They are often spotted on coasts, piers, large bodies of water, and landfills. However, unlike many other gulls, they prefer to nest near freshwater sources.

 

If you see a gull inland, it’s most likely a Ring-billed Gull. These birds have adapted well to human-disturbed areas and are common around cities, farmlands, docks, and parking lots. In fact, I see them often near my home, scavenging for food in a Target parking lot!

To see a complete list of the types of gulls and terns that live in Maine, many of which are white, check out the article below.

 


#5. Great Egret

  • Ardea alba

white birds

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Large, white bird with long, black legs.
  • S-curved neck and a dagger-like yellow bill. Look for a greenish area between their eyes and the base of the bill.
  • While they fly, their neck is tucked in, and their long legs trail behind.

 

Appearance-wise, Great Egrets are one of the most stunning white birds found in southern Maine. They especially put on a show during breeding season when they grow long feathery plumes, called aigrettes, which are held up during courtship displays.

Great Egret Range Map

great egret range map

 

These aigrettes are so beautiful, Great Egrets were almost hunted to extinction in the 19th century because these white feathers made such nice decorations on ladies’ hats. The National Audubon Society was actually formed in response to help protect these birds from being slaughtered. To this day, the Great Egret serves as the organization’s symbol.

 


#6. Snowy Egret

  • Egretta thula

snowy egret

Identifying Characteristics:

  • A completely white, medium-sized bird with a black dagger-like bill.
  • Black legs, but their feet are yellow.
  • A yellow patch of skin beneath their eye.

 

These beautiful white birds will often use their yellow feet to stir up water or mud to help them uncover hiding invertebrates, amphibians, or fish. Once their prey has been found, Snowy Egrets have no problem running their food down to finish the job!

Snowy Egret Range Map

snowy egret range map

 

Interestingly, Snowy Egrets will breed with other heron species, such as similarly sized birds like Tricolored Herons, Little Blue Herons, and Cattle Egrets. So if you see a heron that you can’t seem to identify, it may be a hybrid!

 


#7. Tundra Swan

  • Cygnus columbianus

tundra swan

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Large, white bird with a long white neck.
  • Entirely black bill.
  • Look for a yellow patch on their black facial skin, located just below the eye, to correctly identify.
  • Smaller than Trumpeter Swans.

 

Tundra Swans form long-term, loyal relationships. Typically by the time they are 2 or 3, they have found a partner. Once that happens, these two birds will breed, feed, roost, and travel together year-round.

 

The most common sound these white birds make is a “hoo-ho-hoo” bugle, emphasizing the second syllable. (Listen below)

Another typical sound associated with Tundra Swans is the whistling of their wings. In fact, Lewis and Clark initially called them “whistling swans” when they first encountered them, and many people still use this name today.

 


#8. Gyrfalcon

  • Falco rusticolus

Gyrfalcon

The Gyrfalcon, sometimes known as the Gyr, is the largest falcon species in the world! These raptors are birds of the Arctic, and they breed on the sides of cliffs in remote areas of Alaska and Canada. Luckily, they live in secluded areas and are safe from human disturbances, but they do face challenges from climate change.

 

Gyrfalcons are polymorphic species, which means that their feathers and plumage vary a bit. These falcons range in color from almost entirely white to very dark. Some of the morphs make the Gyrfalcon look similar to a Peregrine Falcon. Also, males and females show no color differences. The only difference between the sexes is that females are larger and bulkier than males.

gryfalcon range map

 

During the winter months, Gyrs have to come south from the high Arctic to find food. Depending on the specific year, you never know how far south they may come!

 

Gyrfalcons will eat almost ANYTHING they can catch. The long list includes hares, ground squirrels, young Arctic Foxes, lemmings, songbirds, shorebirds, seabirds, waterfowl, and even other raptors, such as owls, hawks, and the Peregrine Falcon! With that being said, their primary source of food is ptarmigans.

 


Which of the white birds have you seen before in Maine?

 

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