33 Common WILDFLOWERS Found in Nevada! (2024)

There are hundreds of different wildflowers found in Nevada!

Because of the vast amount of species, it can be really hard to correctly identify one that you found. In addition, there are numerous cultivars and hybrids you may come across that probably originated at a local garden center.

Wildflowers in Nevada

These facts make it difficult to put together a list of wildflowers in Nevada. 🙂

Regardless, I did my best to find the most common and widespread species. To make the list easier to navigate, I have organized the wildflowers below by color. Click the links below to go directly to that section.

Please remember these two things as you read:

  • This list is not a recommendation of plants you should plant in your yard. It is an ID guide to wildflowers you may encounter. While many of the wildflowers below would make excellent additions to your gardens, there are also various species that are invasive and should be avoided and destroyed if it starts growing on your property.
  • Determining the color of some wildflowers is a matter of opinion. For example, certain species may appear purplish-blue to me, so I included it in the “Blue Wildflowers” section, but you think it’s more of a blue-purple, and it belongs under “Purple Wildflowers.”

Here are 33 common types of wildflowers in Nevada:


BLUE WILDFLOWERS:


#1. Chicory

  • Cichorium intybus

Types of common wildflowers in Nevada

Growing Information

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-10
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate mature size: 1-4′ (30-120 cm)
  • Bloom Time: Summer, Fall
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun

This non-native wildflower is found throughout Nevada.

Typically you will find this plant where it’s sunny and dry, so look for it along roads and open fields.

The exciting thing about Chicory is that you can eat it! The leaves are high in vitamins and minerals. You can eat the leaves as a vegetable or in a salad, but beware, they are very bitter tasting. The roots can also be boiled and eaten with butter. Sometimes the root is roasted and ground as a substitute or additive to coffee.

Interestingly, Chicory flowers only bloom for ONE day. And in hot weather, the flower may only be open for a few hours!


#2. Blue Vervain

  • Verbena hastata

Nevada wildflowers

Also known as the American Vervain or Swamp Verbena.

Growing Information

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate mature size: 2-5′ (60-150cm)
  • Bloom Time: Early Summer-Fall
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Look for this hardy and drought-resistant wildflower in Nevada in plains, foothills, wet soils, ditches, shores, and wet fields.

The Blue Vervain attracts various native bees, honeybees, beneficial wasps, small butterflies, skippers, and moths. It is also a great host plant because the Verbena Moth and the Common Buckeye Butterfly caterpillars feed on the leaves.


#3. Teasel

  • Dipsacus fullonum

Wildflower species in Nevada

Also known as Wild Teasel and Fuller’s Teasel.

Growing Information

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8
  • Life Cycle: Biennial
  • Approximate mature size: 4-6′ (120-180 cm)
  • Bloom Time: Summer, Fall
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

These common wildflowers are easily identified in Nevada by their prickly stem and leaves and unique purplish-blue flowers.

Teasel attracts certain types of birds, such as goldfinches, because the seeds are an important winter food resource.

Teasel has health benefits such as a kidney tonic, which promotes the healing of broken bones and torn, injured, or inflamed connective tissue. This makes it helpful in treating Lyme disease symptoms since the Lyme-inducing bacteria often target the nerve, muscle & connective tissues.


#4. Forget-me-not

  • Myosotis scorpioides

Wildflowers in Nevada

Also known as Water Forget-me-not, True Forget-me-not, Love-me, Mouse-ear, Mouse-ear Scorpion Grass, Scorpion Weed, and Snake Grass.

Growing Information

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 5-9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate mature size: 6-12″ (15-30 cm)
  • Bloom Time: Spring, Summer, Fall
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun, Partial Sun

The Forget-me-not is also known as the Scorpion Weed. The reason for this is because it has a coiled flower stalk like a tail of a scorpion. Some have also said the common name Forget-me-not comes from this plant’s unpleasant taste or odor, which is hard to forget!

The seeds of Forget-me-nots spread rapidly, and you may find them sprouting up in places you didn’t plan for. Don’t worry; you can dig up the flower and replant it anywhere you want since they are not bothered by being moved. I would suggest not destroying the plant because this perennial attracts butterflies, bees, and moths.


#5. Bachelor’s Button

  • Centaurea cyanus

Types of common wildflowers in Nevada

Also known as Cornflower.

Growing Information

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 2-4
  • Life Cycle: Annual
  • Approximate mature size: 1-3′ (30-90cm)
  • Bloom Time: Late Spring-Late Summer
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Light Shade

This common wildflower is a magnet for butterflies in Nevada. In addition, it’s excellent for cutting and drying.

The Bachelor’s Button flowers are daisy-like and virtually pest and disease-free. And can you believe they are also deer and drought tolerant?! I recommend this easy-to-grow plant for borders of flower beds or rock gardens.


PURPLE WILDFLOWERS:


#6. Bull Thistle

  • Cirsium vulgare

Types of Purple Wildflowers

Also known as Boar Thistle, Common Thistle, Dodder, and Spear Thistle.

Growing Information

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3a-8b
  • Life Cycle: Biennial
  • Approximate mature size: 2-6′ (.6-1.8 m)
  • Bloom Time: Summer, Fall
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun, Sun to Partial Shade

Bull Thistle is a common wildflower in Nevada.

But be careful when handling it because it’s spiny!

The seeds of this thistle are an excellent food source for goldfinches. However, these birds also use the thistledown to line their nests; thus, they wait until the flowers bloom in late summer to raise their young. In addition, it’s also a great flower if you want to attract giant bees and butterflies.


#7. Common Burdock

  • Arctium minus

purple wildflowers

Also known as Lesser Burdock, Little Burdock, Louse-bur, Button-bur, Cuckoo-button, and Wild Rhubarb.

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 4a-10b
  • Life Cycle: Biennial
  • Approximate mature size: 4-6′ (120-180 cm)
  • Bloom Time: Mid Summer – Mid Fall
  • Sun Exposure: Sun to Partial Shade

Look for this wildflower in Nevada in pastures, open prairies, hayfields, roadsides, old fields, barnyards, railways, and other disturbed areas.

Common Burdock has large leaves and deep purple flowers resembling rhubarb, making it easy to identify. After the flower head dries, they are similar to velcro because they stick onto humans and animals to transport the entire seed head!

This wildflower attracts bees, butterflies, and birds. But be careful if you handle this plant; it may cause skin irritation or an allergic reaction.


#8. Bee Balm

  • Monarda fistulosa

purple wildflowers

Buy/View Seeds HERE!

Also known as Wild Bergamot, Horsemint, and Wild Bee Balm.

Growing Information

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3a-9b
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate mature size: 2-4′ (60-120 cm)
  • Bloom Time: Summer
  • Sun Exposure: Sun to Partial Shade

This perennial has beautiful lilac-purple blooms. Bee Balm can be found in dry areas of fields, prairies, and along roads in Nevada.

The main reason that I grow Bee Balm in my flower garden is to attract hummingbirds, butterflies, and pollinator bees. When this NATIVE perennial is in full bloom, birds and insects can’t resist visiting the nectar-rich flowers. Many people claim that Bee Balm is so effective at drawing in hummingbirds that they no longer have to worry about filling their feeders!

Interestingly, Bee Balm leaves make a refreshing tea that provides many health benefits, as its antimicrobial properties help ward off colds and the flu.


#9. Purple Loosestrife

  • Lythrum salicaria

purple wildflowers

Also known as Spiked Loosetrife and Purple Lythrum.

Growing Information

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3a-9b
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate mature size: 2-5′ (60-150 cm)
  • Bloom Time: Summer
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Typically you will see this wildflower in Nevada in wet areas.

For example, look for it in wet meadows, marshes, and along lakes. It’s hard to believe Purple Loosestrife is usually not welcome, but this invasive species can take over and push out native plants.

Purple Loosestrife reproduces VERY quickly, as each flower spike can produce up to 300,000 seeds. In addition, it also spreads by growing new shoots from its roots.


#10. Dame’s Rocket

  • Hesperis matronalis

purple wildflowers

Also known as the Damask-violet, Dame’s-violet, Dames-wort, Dame’s Gilliflower, Night-scented Gilliflower, Queen’s Gilliflower, Rogue’s Gilliflower, Summer Lilac, Sweet Rocket, Mother-of-the-evening, Good & Plenties, and Winter Gilliflower.

Growing Information

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9
  • Life Cycle: Biennials or Short-lived Perennials
  • Approximate mature size: 1-4′ (30-122 cm)
  • Bloom Time: Early to Mid Spring
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

This wildflower is widespread throughout Nevada.

Dame’s Rocket is fast-spreading and found in meadows and woodlands. Look for them included in prepackaged “wildflower seed” mixes.

In some areas, this plant is considered invasive. However, the young leaves of this spring-blooming flower are high in Vitamin C, can be eaten in salads, and have a slightly bitter taste.


#11. Heal-All

  • Prunella vulgaris

Types of Blue Wildflowers

Also known as Common Self-heal, Woundwort, Heart-of-the-earth, Carpenter’s Herb, Brownwort, or Blue Curls.

Growing Information

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate mature size: 6-12″ (15-30cm)
  • Bloom Time: Late Spring-Late Fall
  • Sun Exposure: Sun to Partial Shade

This wildflower is one of the most common in Nevada.

You will find Heal-all in lawns, along roadsides, and on the edge of woodlands. It’s especially aggressive in large grassy areas.

This plant attracts butterflies, bees, and other pollinators. As a result, it is often used as a ground cover on border fronts, meadows, and naturalized landscapes.


PINK WILDFLOWERS:


#12. Swamp Milkweed

  • Asclepias incarnata

Buy seeds HERE!

Also known as Pink Milkweed.

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-11
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 24-72 in (61-183 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Summer to Fall
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Swamp Milkweed is a NATIVE wildflower in Nevada.

It grows in wet meadows and along lakeshores. Look for its clusters of deep pink flowers to identify it.

If you want a variety of pollinators to visit your garden, Swamp Milkweed is an ideal wildflower to plant. Its clusters of fragrant flowers are attractive to hummingbirds, bees, and butterflies. The leaves are an incredibly important food source for Monarch caterpillars.


#13. Spreading Dogbane

  • Apocynum androsaemifolium

Also known as Fly-trap Dogbane, Bitterroot.

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 2-9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 24-60 in (61-152 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Summer
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Full Shade

As you might have guessed from its name, Spreading Dogbane is a prolific grower, which is why you’ll find it widespread across both North America and Europe. It’s called “dogbane” because it is highly poisonous to dogs (and humans too).

Spreading Dogbane has small, pink bell-shaped flowers and a scent similar to lilac. Look for this wildflower in Nevada in the sandy soil of streambanks.


#14. Wild Mint

  • Mentha arvensis

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-8
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 3.9-39 in (10-99 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Late Spring to Early Summer
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Light Shade

Wild Mint has dense clusters of lavender, pink, or white bell-shaped flowers. Like other species of mint, the fragrance is most potent when the leaves are damaged.

Look for this native wildflower in Nevada in wetlands with partial sunlight. It grows best on stream and river banks.


#15. Fireweed

  • Chamerion angustifolium

Also known as Willow Herb.

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 2-8
  • Life Cycle: Annual or Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 18-120 in (46-305 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Late Spring and Summer
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

True to its name, Fireweed is a resilient plant that will be the first to grow in clearings recently devastated by forest fires. For example, Fireweed was seen growing throughout Washington State one year after Mount St. Helens erupted in 1980.

To find Fireweed, look for striking spikes of purplish-pink flowers covering a landscape. Hummingbirds, moths, and butterflies like to feed on this wildflower.


#16. Everlasting Pea

  • Lathyrus latifolius

Also known as Perennial Pea, Perennial Peavine.

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 60-120 in (152-305 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Summer to Fall
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

The Everlasting Pea is a frost-hardy vine that requires little care and grows like a weed when not controlled. It is native to Europe but has been naturalized in North America since the 1700s. Look for this wildflower in Nevada on sunny banks with clay-rich soil.

The long tendrils and purplish-pink flowers of the Everlasting Pea look beautiful when climbing trellises or fences in your garden. You can also use it as a sprawling groundcover for banks and slopes.

Butterflies and bees find the pea-shaped blooms attractive. The vibrant colors will fade to white as the Everlasting Pea matures.


#17. Crown Vetch

  • Securigera varia

Also known as Purple Crownvetch, Crownvetch.

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 12-72 in (30-183 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Summer to Fall
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Even though the large, pink clover-like blooms of Crown Vetch are beautiful, this plant is invasive in North America. Native to Europe, Asia, and Africa, Crown Vetch was introduced locally to be used as a groundcover in controlling soil erosion.

Look for this wildflower in Nevada on sunny, sandy banks where it can push out less hardy plants.

If you plant Crown Vetch on your property, choose an isolated location far away from flower gardens. Don’t forget to control its growth so it doesn’t spread to other areas and invade native species and ecosystems.


YELLOW WILDFLOWERS:


#18. Birds-foot Trefoil

  • Lotus corniculatus

Also known as Birdfoot Deervetch, Bloomfell, Cat’s Clover, and Crowtoes.

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 2-8 in (5-20 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Late Spring to Early Summer
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Birds-foot Trefoil has yellow, orange, and sometimes red-streaked flowers atop long stalks. As beautiful as the blooms are, this wildflower is considered invasive in many areas of Nevada. It tends to choke out native plants and overtake entire gardens and fields.

It’s especially aggressive in sandy soil, fields, parks, and roadsides. However, Birds-foot Trefoil is useful as long as you can control its growth. Its flowers serve as an important food source for many pollinators, such as bees, butterflies, and moths.


#19. St. John’s Wort

  • Hypericum perforatum

Also known as Klamath Weed, Tipton Weed, and Goat Weed.

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 11-35 in (28-89 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Summer
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Sun

St. John’s Wort has clusters of showy yellow flowers. It grows abundantly in prairies, pastures, disturbed fields, and sandy soils.

Unfortunately, this plant is an invasive species in North America. Not only does St. John’s Wort outcompete other plants, but it can also be fatal to horses, sheep, and other livestock when ingested.

Although some bees, butterflies, and beetles feed on the pollen of St. John’s Wort, you shouldn’t allow this plant to spread in landscapes. It can do more harm than good in ecosystems.


#20. Sneezeweed

  • Helenium autumnale

Also known as False Sunflower, Bitterweed.

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8a
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 24-60 in (90-150 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Summer to Fall
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Sun

To identify this wildflower in Nevada, look for pretty daisy-like flowers blooming in the fall. You can find Sneezeweed along streams, ponds, swamps, and wetlands. Some cultivars are popularly grown in gardens and have showier flowers than ones in the wild.

Despite the name Sneezeweed, the pollen from this plant isn’t likely to cause allergic reactions. Its name comes from an old medicinal practice of drying and crushing its leaves to make snuff, a powder that causes sneezing. This practice was thought to remove evil spirits from the body!

Native bees, honey bees, wasps, butterflies, and beetles are attracted to the Sneezeweed. It will grow in most soil conditions and is resistant to common diseases.


#21. Wild Parsnip

  • Pastinaca sativa

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-8
  • Life Cycle: Biennial or Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 48-59 in (122-150 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Early Summer
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Sun

You might be familiar with parsnip as a delicious root vegetable, but its relative that grows in the wild is dangerous to your health! Wild Parsnips smell and taste like cultivated parsnips, except their leaves and stems cause severe blisters and burns. (see below!)

To identify this wildflower in Nevada, look for its grooved stems and flat-topped flower clusters of yellow blooms.

Wild Parsnip is an invasive species in North America. It spreads rapidly, threatening to choke native plants and poisoning livestock that eats it. You can spot its vivid yellow blooms in ditches, roadsides, and abandoned fields in early spring.


#22. Goldenrod

  • Solidago

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 36-60 in (90-150 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Late Summer to Fall
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun

There are over 120 species of Goldenrod native to North America!

The blooms of Goldenrod may be tiny, but they make up for their small size with their vibrant color in the summer and fall. They grow in clusters on top of branched stems with stiff leaves.

Although Goldenrod is often blamed for hay fever, pollen grains from similar-looking plants like ragweed are likely the culprit. Enjoying the uniquely-shaped blooms is perfectly safe, but this wildflower can spread aggressively in gardens. You can contain its growth by planting it in pots and pruning it regularly.

A wide variety of bees, butterflies, and beetles rely on this native wildflower in Nevada.


#23. Common Sunflower

  • Helianthus annuus

Buy sunflower seeds for planting HERE!

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 2-11
  • Life Cycle: Annual
  • Approximate Mature Size: 36-120 in (91-304 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Summer
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun

The Common Sunflower is one of the most popular flowers all over the world, and rightfully so. The impressively large yellow petals and attractive dark centers are a classic sight in the late summer and early fall.

In the wild, look for sunflowers in prairies, grasslands, old fields, roadsides, and forest edges. But, of course, you will also find sunflowers in gardens where they’re enjoyed by people and animals alike.

Aside from their aesthetic value, Common Sunflowers also feed populations of bees, butterflies, and insect pollinators. Birds and mammals enjoy the seeds, and the best part is that you can eat them too for a tasty snack!


#24. Common Mullein

  • Verbascum thapsus

Also known as Flannel Plant, Big Taper, Velvet Dock.

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9
  • Life Cycle: Annual or Biennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 24-84 in (60-213 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Summer
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun

Common Mullein is native to Europe, Asia, and Africa, but this wildflower is now considered a naturalized species in Nevada. It grows so well that it can take over roadsides, meadows, and pasture lands.

You can recognize it by its small yellow blooms densely grouped on a tall stem and the velvety, dense leaves at the base of the plant. As the stems shoot upwards from a base of large leaves, the overall appearance of this plant might remind you of corn.

Common Mullein is a valuable medicinal plant. In ancient times, it was used to treat pulmonary diseases, inflammations, and various ailments. Today, you can find its dried leaves, flowers, and oil extracts in health stores.


#25. Spiny Sow-thistle

  • Sonchus asper

Also known as Rough Milk Thistle.

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 6b-9a
  • Life Cycle: Annual or Biennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 11-43 in (30-110 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Spring to Summer
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

Spiny Sow-thistle is an invasive wildflower that grows throughout Nevada. It can be found in pastures, roadsides, vacant lots, construction sites, grasslands, and waste areas. It’s native to Europe, North Africa, and Asia.

Don’t let Spiny Sow-thistle spread if you see it growing near your yard. It can overwhelm native plants and host diseases and pests that affect garden plants and crops. To identify Spiny Sow-thistle, look for spiky leaves and dandelion-like yellow flowers on tall stems.


#26. Dandelion

  • Taraxacum officinale

Also known as Common Dandelion, Lion’s Tooth, Blowball.

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-10
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 6-12 in (15-30 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Spring to Fall
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun

The bright yellow flowers that turn into balls of silver-tufted seed heads make Dandelions easy to recognize. Look for these common wildflowers in Nevada in meadows, fields, river shores, lakes, and disturbed habitats. Honeybees and other beneficial insects are attracted to Dandelions.

Dandelions tend to grow like weeds on lawns and roadsides. This species is native to Europe and Asia but has spread worldwide because of how resilient it is in most soil conditions.

You can eat the leaves, roots, and flowers of the Dandelion! They taste like honey when fresh but turn bitter as the plant ages. Use them to make jam, salad, wine, or tea.


WHITE WILDFLOWERS:


#27. Indian Hemp

  • Apocynum cannabinum

Also known as Dogbane, Hemp Dogbane, Prairie Dogbane, Amy Root, Rheumatism Root, Wild Cotton.

Growing Information

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3b-11
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 24-60 in (61-152 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Spring to Summer
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Sun

Despite being native to North America, this wildflower is considered an aggressive weed in Nevada.

You’ll likely find it in dry, rocky woods, meadows, and prairies. Unfortunately, it also thrives on farms where it’s known to reduce the yield of corn, soybeans, and other crops.

In addition to its invasive nature, all parts of Indian Hemp are highly toxic to humans, dogs, and livestock. Avoid touching the milky sap, which can cause blisters on your skin. Its stiff, reddish stems and bushy lance-shaped leaves will help you identify this plant.

The small white flowers are rich with nectar, so don’t be surprised to see lots of butterflies and moths where Indian Hemp grows.


#28. English Plantain

  • Plantago lanceolata

Also known as Ribwort Plantain, Lanceleaf Indianwheat, Ribgrass.

Growing Information

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 5-9a
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 4-20 in (10-51 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Spring to Fall
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun

The English Plantain is an introduced wildflower in Nevada, originally native to Europe and Asia.

It’s one of the most recognizable lawn weeds with its long, hairy, flowering spikes. These spikes contain small and inconspicuous white flowers. You can spot English Plantain growing in disturbed habitats, dry meadows, grazing pastures, and roadsides. Its flowers are pollinated by flies and beetles, while songbirds eat their seeds.

Interestingly, English Plantain can adapt to different conditions depending on how humans try to eradicate it! For example, this plant naturally grows in tall stalks, but if the area where it grows is frequently mowed, it will grow low to the ground to avoid being cut.


#29. Yarrow

  • Achillea millefolium

Also known as Bloodwort, Carpenter’s Weed, Devil’s Nettle.

Growing Information

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 24-36 in (61-91 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Summer

Planting Yarrow in your garden will reward you with abundant flowers that grow in clusters. They have small feathery leaves that look like ferns, and their scent might remind you of chrysanthemums (mums).

Some Yarrow plants were introduced from Europe in colonial times. However, there are many native subspecies of this wildflower in Nevada. Together, they form colorful hybrids that will attract bees, wasps, beetles, moths, and butterflies to your garden.

Yarrow plants naturally occur in disturbed areas, grasslands, open forests, and roadsides. They can tolerate drought and survive in less than perfect conditions.


#30. Catnip

  • Nepeta cataria

Also known as Catswort, Catmint, Field Balm.

Growing Information

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9a
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 24-36 in (61-91 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Spring to Fall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Sun

Catnip is a famous plant with a long history of medicinal and culinary uses. Of course, you might know of Catnip as a recreational stimulant for cats. As a member of the Mint family, it has aromatic leaves that can repel mosquitoes, cockroaches, and termites.

Catnip is native to Europe and Asia, but this wildflower is naturalized in Nevada. You can find it growing on roadsides, streams, waste grounds, dry banks, and fields. The triangular, veiny leaves and the small white or purple spotted flowers will help you recognize this plant.

Bees, butterflies, wasps, flies, and many pollinators love the nectar-laden flowers of Catnip. In addition, you can expect goldfinches and other birds to eat the seeds in the fall. Catnip grows best in full sun and well-drained soils.


#31. White Clover

  • Trifolium repens

Also known as Dutch Clover, Shamrock, Honeysuckle Grass.

Growing Information

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-10a
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 4-6 in (10-15 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Spring to Fall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Sun

White Clover is native to Europe and Asia, but this wildflower is considered a naturalized species in Nevada. It grows so well that it can take over lawns, roadsides, pastures, and waste areas. Fortunately, however, White Clover doesn’t usually compete with native vegetation!

From spring to fall, White Clover blooms with an abundance of creamy white, rounded flowers. You might be familiar with its green leaves, which typically have three leaflets. But if you find one with four, you can consider yourself lucky! 🙂

Interestingly, all parts of the White Clover are edible. You can use the dried flowers to make tea or the young leaves in a salad. You can also grind the flowers and seed pods to be sprinkled as a seasoning on cooked food. It has a subtle vanilla-like flavor.


RED & ORANGE WILDFLOWERS:


#32. Cardinal Flower

  • Lobelia cardinalis

Buy seeds HERE!

Also known as Red Bay, Scarlet Lobelia, Indian Pink, Water Gladiole, Slinkweed, Bog Sage, Hog’s Physic.

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9a
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 3.6-72 in (9-183 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Mid-Summer to Early Fall
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade

The blooms on this wildflower cluster on the end of a long stalk. The Cardinal Flower has dark green leaves with purple undersides.

If you’re especially fond of hummingbirds, you can use the Cardinal Flower to attract them to your neighborhood. While other insects might find it hard to reach the sweet nectar inside, the tubular flowers are perfect for the long beaks of hummingbirds.

Cardinal Flowers grow well in a garden setting. Plant it in an area with partial sun for a beautiful pop of red that will attract hummingbirds!


#33. Spotted Coralroot

  • Corallorhiza maculata

Also known as Summer Coralroot, Speckled Coral Root, and Many-flowered Coral Root.

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 3.9-31 in (10-79 cm) tall
  • Bloom Time: Early Summer
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Shade

This wildflower is found in wooded areas in Nevada.

The most interesting feature of Spotted Coralroot is that it doesn’t have any leaves! Instead, the bare stalks produce clusters of flowers. Since this plant isn’t capable of photosynthesis, it siphons nutrients from mycorrhizal fungi, which is a natural fungus that occurs in its roots.

Mining bees are especially attracted to Spotted Coralroot. Although they pollinate this native orchid, it can also self-pollinate by transferring its pollen as its flower opens.


Do you want to dive deeper into all the wildflowers in Nevada?

Then check out this field guide!

View on Amazon


Which of these wildflowers have you found in Nevada?

Leave a COMMENT below! 🙂

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *