32 COMMON Flowers That Attract Hummingbirds! (2024)

“What flowers attract hummingbirds?”

best hummingbird flowers

Trying to sort through hundreds of potential flowers that hummingbirds (might) like can get frustrating and time-consuming. So after many hours and hours of research, I thought it would be worthwhile to share some of the best flowers that I use or have come across that attract hummingbirds.

In general, here are some traits that make a great hummingbird flower:

  • LOTS of nectar for the hummingbirds to eat.
  • Tubular-shaped flowers, which don’t allow other pollinators, like bees and butterflies, to access the nectar.
  • The color of RED. Hummingbirds are most attracted to red flowers.
  • NATIVE to North America.

You will notice a USDA Hardiness Zone listed for each hummingbird flower in the article. This refers to areas of the United States where plants do best, based on temperature.

Making sure your hummingbird flowers are appropriate for YOUR hardiness zones is extremely important! And it’s the reason that a hummingbird garden in Alabama or California will look completely different than the hummingbird habitat I have created in my backyard in Ohio.

32 Kinds of Hummingbird Flowers:


#1. Trumpet Vine (Also called Trumpet Creeper)

  • Campsis radicans

hummingbird flowers

Buy/View Seeds HERE

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: Vines can climb up to 40 feet high
  • Bloom Time: July-September
  • Light Requirements: Full to partial sun

Trumpet Vine is a perfect hummingbird flower (it’s even commonly referred to as “hummingbird vine”), as it features long, tubular, bright flowers with lots of nectar.

It’s native to the southeast United States but is easy to grow in most of the country. And I do mean GROW. It has a reputation for growing like crazy, and I can second that with my first-hand experience. It needs to be trimmed regularly, or it will take over an entire area. The vine gets so big that many birds will even nest in its dense foliage!

It is widely available, and I can always find Trumpet Vine at my local garden centers. Typically, it takes a year or two after planting to get bright and beautiful flowers.


#2. Trumpet Honeysuckle

  • Lonicera sempervirens

flowers that attract hummingbirds

Buy/View Seeds HERE

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 15 feet tall x 6 feet wide (climbing)
  • Bloom Time: May-June
  • Light Requirements: Full to partial sun

Native to the eastern United States, Trumpet Honeysuckle is a favorite of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. These birds love the bright clusters of red and orange tubular flowers.

It has similar features to the Trumpet Vine, and many people get the two mixed up. However, a benefit of the Trumpet Honeysuckle is that it’s not as aggressive and does not get as big as the Trumpet Vine. Because of this, Trumpet Honeysuckle may fit better in your hummingbird garden.


#3. Red Cardinal Flower

  • Lobelia cardinalis

red hummingbird flowers

Buy/View Seeds HERE

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: ~ 3 feet tall
  • Bloom Time: July-September
  • Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade

The Red Cardinal Flower is an excellent addition to any backyard hummingbird flower garden. I love that it’s native to almost the entire lower 48 states and eastern Canada.

It’s gorgeous when in bloom, providing vibrant red tubular flowers. The flowers are too long for most insects, and the Red Cardinal Flower relies on attracting hummingbirds for pollination.

It grows best when not in full sun and likes moisture. In the wild, you’re most likely to see Red Cardinal Flowers on shady stream banks in late summer!


#4. Bee Balm

  • Monarda

purple hummingbird flowers

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Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 3-4 feet tall, up to 3 feet wide (depends on which cultivar selected)
  • Bloom Time: July-September
  • Light Requirements: Full Sun, but also does well with a bit of shade

Bee Balm is a smaller perennial flower. Hummingbirds, along with bees and butterflies, love visiting these plants to get nectar. There are Bee Balm species native to nearly every part of North America.

There are over 50 cultivars commercially available, representing many different colors. Some are mildew resistant, and certain ones will be better for your region than others, so please check the hardiness zone and do your research.

Other common names for Bee Balm include monarda, horsemint, oswego tea, and bergamot.

This plant is easy to grow, deer resistant, and drought-resistant! And as a bonus, Bee Balm is also great for attracting butterflies!


#5. Sage (Salvia)

  • Salvia spp.

hummingbird flowers that attract hummingbirds

Buy/View Seeds HERE

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 4 to 10 (varies by species)
  • Life Cycle: Most are perennial, but annual varieties are also available.
  • Approximate Mature Size: Wide size range between different species; from 6 inches to 3 feet tall.
  • Bloom Time: April-September
  • Light Requirements: Full Sun

Sage has it all; it’s easy to grow, looks great in your garden, attracts hummingbirds, and the leaves can even be eaten!

Sage is the common name of any plant under the genus Salvia. So, unfortunately, it’s going to be hard to give a lot of specific details about which Sage flower would do best in your backyard because there are hundreds of different species, along with many more cultivars that grow well in hummingbird gardens all across the country.

Sage comes in all different sizes and colors. Some are annual, some perennial. Many are native to the Americas, but the most common, Salvia officinalis (Common Sage), originates from the Mediterranean. It’s so common that it’s considered naturalized in North America.

One thing most variations of Sage have in common is they have spikes of tubular flowers. And these flowers are great for attracting hummingbirds, along with other pollinator insects, bees, moths, and butterflies.

My advice is to do some more research or speak to your local nursery and find a variety that will do well where you live. Luckily, Salvia is VERY COMMON at garden centers.


#6. Rhododendron

  • Rhodendron spp.

pink hummingbird flowers

Buy/View Seeds HERE

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-8
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: Up to 10 feet tall and 10 feet wide if not pruned.
  • Bloom Time: April-June
  • Light Requirements: Part Shade. Typically the more moisture provided, the more sun it can handle.

If you have ever seen a Rhododendron in full bloom at the end of May, you will agree that its display is stunning. You can’t blame hummingbirds for being attracted to their vibrant pink flowers.

Over a thousand different species of Rhododendron have been identified, with the majority of them originating from Asia. These plants are very common at garden centers and decorate many lawns across North America.

If possible, try to find a Rhododendron species that is native to North America.

The Catawba Rhododendron (Rhododendron catawbiense) is native to the eastern United States, and is commonly referred to as Catawba rosebay, Catawba rhododendron, mountain rosebay, purple ivy, purple laurel, purple Rhododendron, red laurel, rosebay, or rosebay laurel.

It has beautiful, dark green foliage all year, and hummingbirds will love the gorgeous pink flowers each May. It’s also incredibly hardy and can survive cold winters.


#7. Lupine

  • Lupinus

what flowers attract hummingbirds

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Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial (some Annual)
  • Approximate Mature Size: Too many variations to list, but the average is 3 feet tall and wide.
  • Bloom Time: Depends on zone and variety, but typically May-July.
  • Light Requirements: Sun to Part Shade

Lupine features beautiful, long spikes of flowers. There are many different species and cultivars available, and hummingbirds like them all.

They come in all sizes, so there should be some sort of Lupine that fits your hummingbird flower garden perfectly. The most common colors of Lupine blooms are blue, purple, pink, and white. 

Lupine makes an excellent neighbor to other plants that require nitrogen-rich soil. It increases the nitrogen in the ground, making the soil a better environment for other plants!

In the US, the species that tend to grow best are wild lupine, garden lupine, silvery lupine, and Texas Bluebonnet. Check with your local nursery to find out which one is easiest to grow in your area!


#8. Columbine

  • Aquilegia

beautiful hummingbird flowers

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Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: ~3 feet tall
  • Bloom Time: May
  • Light Requirements: Grows well in the shade. If full sun, provide lots of moisture.

Columbine flowers refer to any species from the genus Aquilegia, many of which are native to North America.

I love the unique look of Columbine, and luckily so do hummingbirds! Its pretty flowers typically bloom in May, right when hummingbirds are making their way back north, so this may be the first plant that you see hummers visiting each spring.

It’s interesting to note that insects have difficulty accessing the nectar, so hummingbirds should have this flower all to themselves.

There are many species and hybrids of Columbine available. Make sure to choose a species that’s native to your area for the best results!


#9. Lily

  • Hemerocallis spp.

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Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 5b to 9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 3 to 8 feet tall
  • Bloom Time: June-August, depending on species and location
  • Light Requirements: Full sun

Lilies are show stoppers in your backyard garden, and it’s just a bonus that hummingbirds are also attracted to their flowers.

There are too many species of lilies to count, but true lilies (Genus Lilium) are typically defined by large, beautiful flowers that grow from bulbs. The most common species of Lily in the eastern United States is Canada Lily, and in the western United States, you’re most likely to see the Columbia Lily.

Typically, Canada Lilies have pinkish-orange blooms that droop downward. Plants can have as many as 20 blooms apiece, making them a perfect choice if you like a lot of color in your garden!

Columbia Lilies are also called tiger lilies, and they have bright orange flowers with spotted petals. As the flowers open, their petals curl back toward the base of the flower, giving the appearance of a gift bow.

In addition to hummingbirds, you can expect to see large butterflies and pollinator bees visiting your lily plants.


#10. Indian Pink (aka Woodland Pinkroot)

  • Spigelia marilandica

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 5b to 9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 1 to 2 feet tall
  • Bloom Time: June
  • Light Requirements: Partial to Full Shade

Indian Pink has beautiful deep red buds that open to bright yellow, 5-pointed flowers. They’re perfect for areas with partial shade and moist soil.

This gorgeous species is definitely one of the BEST hummingbird flowers you can plant.


#11. Fireweed

  • Chamerion angustifolium

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Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 2-7
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 4-6 feet tall, up to 9 feet occasionally
  • Bloom Time: June-September
  • Light Requirements: Partial to Full Sun

The pinkish-purple flowers of the Fireweed plant make a welcome addition to any hummingbird garden!

This species can quickly take over a garden without regular trimming since it spreads by seed and underground rhizomes. One plant can produce up to 80,000 seeds in a single season!


#12. Larkspur

  • Delphinium exaltatum
  • Delphinium glaucum

Buy/View Seeds HERE

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: Up to 8 feet tall
  • Bloom Time: March-August, depending on species and location.
  • Light Requirements: Partial to Full Shade

Larkspur’s large blue flowers make an attractive addition to your hummingbird garden. However, use caution if you have animals or children since Larkspur is toxic to humans and livestock. It can cause skin irritation and stomach upset in humans and is a common cause of cattle poisoning.


#13. Manzanita

  • Arctostaphylos

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 8-10
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 5-15 feet tall
  • Bloom Time: December-March
  • Light Requirements: Partial shade to full sun

Anna’s hummingbirds congregate at Manzanita bushes to drink nectar from their flowers, and they also use the branches of this shrub as a nesting site.

This ornamental plant has distinctive red bark, small green leaves, and red berries. There are over 95 distinct species of Manzanita plant native to the US! To choose one that’s right for your area, check with your local nursery and purchase a native species. 


#14. Azalea

  • Azalea

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 5-9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: Typically 4-6 feet tall; some varieties are much smaller, and some can grow up to 20 feet!
  • Bloom Time: February-September
  • Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade

Azaleas are members of the Rhododendron family. Their bright pink blooms and relatively low-maintenance growing requirements make them attractive to many home gardeners.

They’re so popular that over 10,000 cultivars with different colors, sizes, and growth patterns have been bred! Since there are so many different varieties, it’s best to talk with your local nursery to find a cultivar to fit your needs.

As an addition to your hummingbird garden, Azaleas grow best with lots of sunlight in well-drained soil.


#15. Hummingbird Trumpet

  • Zauschneria arizonica

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Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 5-9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 18-24 inches tall
  • Bloom Time: July-October
  • Light Requirements: Full Sun

Hummingbird Trumpet is a hardy, drought-tolerant plant in the Fuschia family.

Once established, Hummingbird Trumpet is basically maintenance-free and doesn’t require any pruning or special care. However, Hummingbird Trumpet does best in full sun and well-drained soil.


#16. Red Buckeye

  • Aesculus pavia

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Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-8
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 15-20 feet tall
  • Bloom Time: April-May
  • Light Requirements: Shade to full sun

In addition to hummingbirds, the bright red flowers on the Red Buckeye Tree also attract butterflies. This ornamental tree is a great option if you have a sunny spot in your yard.

If you choose a Red Buckeye Tree, keep in mind that the seeds are poisonous to humans and livestock. So make sure your Red Buckeye is planted out of the way of animals and children.


#17. Golden Currant

  • Ribes aureum

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Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 5-8
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 4-5 feet tall
  • Bloom Time: March-May
  • Light Requirements: Full sun

Golden Currant shrubs have beautiful bright yellow blooms that turn orange to violet late in the season, making them an excellent addition to your hummingbird garden.

Their berries are deep yellow-orange. This plant is easy to grow in many soil types, but check your local regulations before planting. Some states have outlawed planting Golden Currant because it can introduce a fungus that kills white pine trees.


#18. Scarlet Trumpet

  • Distictis buccinatoria

Buy/View Seeds HERE

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 30-40 feet tall (climbing)
  • Bloom Time: July-September
  • Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade

Red Trumpet Vine is one of the more labor-intensive hummingbird flowers on this list. Because it’s a climbing vine, it requires regular pruning to keep it from taking over neighboring plants. Two hard cuttings and monthly maintenance pruning are recommended!

But, if you have the time to dedicate, you’ll be rewarded with lots of bright red trumpet-shaped flowers that attract hummingbirds, butterflies, and other pollinators.


#19. Mountain Laurel

  • Kalmia latifolia

Buy/View Seeds HERE

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 5-9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 7-15 feet tall; dwarf variety grows only 4 feet tall
  • Bloom Time: April-June
  • Light Requirements: Partial sun to partial shade

Mountain Laurel is an exceptionally beautiful shrub with striking blooms!

The petals are fused, making each blossom look like a tiny bowl. It comes in a variety of colors ranging from white to dark rose.

You can grow Mountain Laurel in partial shade, which is helpful for smaller hummingbird gardens that are close to your house. Use caution, however, since Mountain Laurel is poisonous to pets and humans.


#20. Coral Bells

  • Heuchera sanguinea

Buy/View Seeds HERE

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 6-16 inches tall
  • Bloom Time: May-July
  • Light Requirements: Partial shade

Also called Alumroot, Coral Bells is a small flowering shrub that grows in varied climates and soil conditions. There are countless species and cultivars, so finding one for your hummingbird garden shouldn’t be hard!

The coloring varies by species, with pink, purple, or white blooms. Coral Bells’ leaves are also striking and can range from deep purple to light green and even golden!


#21. Beard Tongues

  • Penstemon

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Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-8
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 2-4 feet tall
  • Bloom Time: April-June
  • Light Requirements: Full sun

Beardtongue, or Penstemon, is a perennial that does well in full sun. Its many flowers grow on tall, thin stalks that shoot straight up from the plant, giving it the appearance of a firework!

Beardtongue’s tubular blossoms make it a perfect flower for hummingbirds to find nectar and even water that collects inside.

Different species of Beardtongue grow best in different areas of the US, so the best way to find the right one for you is to talk with someone knowledgeable at your local nursery.


#22. New Jersey Tea

  • Ceanothus americanus

Buy/View Seeds HERE

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-8
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 3-4 feet tall
  • Bloom Time: July-August
  • Light Requirements: Full to partial sun

New Jersey Tea is an excellent choice for gardeners to create a border or hedge in their hummingbird garden.

The plants are low to the ground and grow moderately slow, which means they won’t take over a garden even if they’re left to grow naturally. They tolerate drought well and don’t require pruning. As long as your garden gets adequate sunlight, New Jersey Tea should grow well for you!


#23. Anise Hyssop (aka Hummingbird Mint)

  • Agastache foeniculum

Buy/View Seeds HERE

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 5-10
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 4-5 feet tall
  • Bloom Time: June-September
  • Light Requirements: Full sun

If you want to attract hummingbirds and other pollinators to your garden but have some uninvited guests like rabbits and deer, Hummingbird Mint is perfect for you!

Its leaves and stems give off a mild, minty licorice scent that tends to keep mammals away. However, hummingbirds, butterflies, and pollinating bees won’t be able to resist the colorful, tubular blossoms! Look for a spot with well-drained soil, and make sure you pick a variety that grows well in your hardiness zone.


#24. Dense Blazing Star

  • Liatris spicata 

Buy/View Seeds HERE

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 2-4 feet tall
  • Bloom Time: July-August
  • Light Requirements: Full sun

If your ideal hummingbird flower does best when it’s ignored, look no further than the Dense Blazing Star. =)

Its bright purple blooms are a perfect centerpiece for any hummingbird garden. This plant requires almost no maintenance after it’s established and grows in any type of soil. It just needs full sun, and occasionally larger plants may need to be staked to keep them upright.

Bees, hummingbirds, and butterflies all love Dense Blazing Star, so your garden will come alive in summer with buzzing and fluttering visitors!


#25. Phlox

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Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 4-8
  • Life Cycle: Both perennial and annual varieties
  • Approximate Mature Size: Varies significantly from a few inches off the ground up to 6 feet tall.
  • Bloom Time: April-August, depending on variety
  • Light Requirements: Full to partial sun

There are dozens of species of Phlox that range in size, color, and growing condition. This means that no matter what type of hummingbird garden you have, you can probably find a type of Phlox that will work for you!

Varieties like Tall Garden Phlox make a great backdrop, and low-growing Moss Phlox works as ground cover or to fill in between other plants. You can even plant a few different varieties to fill out your garden and bring more color to your blooms. Check with your local nursery to pick a species that will fit your needs.

Many pollinators, especially hummingbirds, are drawn to this versatile plant.


#26. Zinnia

  • Zinnia elegans

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Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 2-8
  • Life Cycle: Annual
  • Approximate Mature Size: 1-3 feet tall
  • Bloom Time: May-October
  • Light Requirements: Full sun

Zinnia, a member of the sunflower family, produces bright, round blooms with many petals. They’re a favorite of pollinator insects because of their large landing area and plentiful pollen. Hummingbirds are also known to visit Zinnias for nectar and to take a rest from flying.

They make a beautiful annual addition to any garden! Plant Zinnias in full sun areas with well-drained soil.


#27. Petunia

  • Petunia

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Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 2-8
  • Life Cycle: Annual
  • Approximate Mature Size: 6-24 inches tall, up to 24 inches wide
  • Bloom Time: April-October
  • Light Requirements: Full to partial sun

Petunias are an easy-to-grow annual with plenty of varieties of different sizes and colors.

If you have a garden that gets at least 5 hours of sun per day, plant Petunias to be rewarded with many blooms! To pick a specific variety, ask your local nursery what type they recommend.

Hummingbirds enjoy their deep, tube-shaped flowers for drinking nectar and water. You can also expect butterflies and bees to visit your Petunia plants.


#28. Impatiens

  • Impatiens

Buy/View Seeds HERE

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 2-9
  • Life Cycle: Annual
  • Approximate Mature Size: 10-16 inches tall
  • Bloom Time: April-June
  • Light Requirements: Full shade

If you like Petunias, but your hummingbird garden gets more shade, you might want to try planting Impatiens instead.

They’re available in similar colors and have many of the same qualities as Petunias, like plentiful blooms. But, unlike Petunias, they prefer shady areas and will do best in only partial or low sun. Hummingbirds, bees, and butterflies all enjoy visiting Impatiens. 

There are hundreds of varieties of impatiens to choose from, so the best way to pick is to talk to someone at your local nursery and find a cultivar that grows well in your area.


#29. Orange Jewelweed

  • Impatiens capensis

orange hummingbird flowers

Buy/View Seeds HERE

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 2-11
  • Life Cycle: Annual
  • Approximate Mature Size: 2-5 feet tall
  • Bloom Time: May-September
  • Light Requirements: Full shade

Orange Jewelweed is one of the few NATIVE Impatiens species.

Their bright orange flowers bloom from late spring to early fall, giving your hummingbird garden a pop of warm color.

It’s a perfect plant if you have a shady spot, especially if you prefer native flowers. Hummingbirds, bees, and butterflies will all visit Orange Jewelweed.


#30. Scarlet Creeper

  • Ipomoea hederifolia

flowers that attract hummingbirds

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 4a-10b
  • Life Cycle: Annual
  • Approximate Mature Size: 10-15 feet tall (climbing)
  • Bloom Time: August-October
  • Light Requirements: Full sun

Scarlet Creeper has long, tubular flowers that end in a flat-petaled bloom. It’s a climbing vine that does best in full sun and well-drained soil.

This plant is an annual in most temperate climates. Scarlet Creeper makes a perfect trellis flower for edges of gardens that get a lot of sunlight.

Plant Scarlet Creeper from seeds in areas protected from the wind. You’ll be rewarded for your effort with plenty of pollinating visitors like hummingbirds and butterflies!


#31. Flowering Tobacco

  • Nicotiana alata

hummingbird flowers - flowering tobacco

Buy/View Seeds HERE

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 3-9
  • Life Cycle: Annual
  • Approximate Mature Size: 3-5 feet tall
  • Bloom Time: July-September
  • Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade

Flowering Tobacco has been cultivated into several ornamental varieties. Since they’re unpalatable to many mammal species, they’re a great option if you have rabbits, deer, or other herbivores in your area.

Even though it isn’t a native plant, flowering tobacco has flowers that are very attractive to hummingbirds and gardeners alike.

The five-petaled blooms come in many shades and can lend a bright pop of color to your hummingbird garden. This annual plant also attracts butterflies and pollinating bees.


#32. Rose of Sharon

  • Hibiscus syriacus

hummingbird flowers - rose of sharon

Buy/View Seeds HERE

Growing Information:

  • USDA Hardiness Zone: 5-9
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • Approximate Mature Size: 8-12 feet tall and 6-10 feet wide
  • Bloom Time: July-October
  • Light Requirements: Full sun to partial shade

Rose of Sharon is a hardy perennial and isn’t a rose at all, but a member of the hibiscus family.

It’s been cultivated into many different sizes and colors, and its blooms range from white to pale pink, purple, and even deep blue.

Hummingbirds love Rose of Sharon because of its plentiful blooms and dense foliage. Since Rose of Sharon blooms later than most other hummingbird flowers, it’s sure to get a lot of visitors late in the season as they prepare to head south.


What is your favorite hummingbird flower?

Tell us about it in the comments!

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95 Comments

  1. You might want to give “Lantana” a try.) Also you may want to look for “Cuphea”. You should be able to search for a Extension from a University local to your area for what works or look up “Master Gardeners” in your area. The Master Gardeners give free advice:)

  2. I live in the Phoenix, Az area and am not sure which zone I’m in (the map print is too small to read on my phone)
    What can I plant, that will survive the hot Spring/Summer season that will attract Hummers. I would also like to attract butterflies.

  3. The first time a hummer buzzed my hair I was weeding a patch of Delphinium, so I always have those planted with mountain sage (pink & purple) and fireweed in my perennial gardens. Our nectar feeders are hung amongst hanging fuchsia and lots of petunias on our upper porch in VT, and we have a couple dozen ruby-throated hummingbirds that raise their families here every summer. Feeding times are quite a show. I’d say that the fuchsia is their favorite, and it draws them right in beside our chairs. They will fly in and dine right next to me, even while I’m dead-heading the plants.

  4. Kniphofia or commonly referred to as “Red hot poker” is loved by the hummers:) The plant likes dry/hot sunny spots. I am in love with all of the salvia’s though as most will bloom all summer and are non stop action with the flying flowers!

  5. I live in Tallahassee, FL, which is in the northwestern part of the state. I planted some deep red and some white Pentas in pots that the hummingbirds seem to really enjoy. The blue Salvias in a planter and a purple Butterfly plant gets frequented by Bumbles, Butterflies, and Hummers. I have a bed of yellow and orange Daylilies and a bed of red and pink Snap Dragons that I’ve seen them visit. I was given a feeder by my neighbor that I can view through my sliding glass door from my kitchen and they are making lots of trips to that now, too. They are just fascinating to watch. I had one watch me while I was watching him one day, lol, it was terrific!

  6. I am in Zone 3 (north of Montreal, Canada) and planted red Salvia Splendens in early June. From the first day of planting, the local Ruby-Throated hummingbirds, male and female I guess as sometimes they look different, have visited. They are now in the habit of multiple visits every single day – or perhaps there are many of them, as I can see them 20-times in a day or more.

  7. Yesterday I saw a hummingbird enjoying my black berry blossoms. I didn’t see his chest but his back was a beautiful, brilliant emerald green! I’m in northeast Ohio and have had this bush for about 10 years.

  8. I love bee balm! I have two varieties, and although it comes back every year, it is plagued by budworm and/or powdery mildew. I won’t use any pesticides – even natural ones – because I’m so afraid it will harm the hummingbirds, bees and butterflies. The two seasons it bloomed without the worms and mildew. It was magnificent!

  9. My butterfly bush in a pot attracted hummingbirds bees and butterflies. I potted it because it is an invasive species but I loved all the creatures that came to visit it. Thank you for this article. I appreciated the links to Amazon.

  10. I’m in central Missouri and have most of the mentioned flowers and several feeders. Last year I added a few snapdragons to fill a space. The hummingbirds were thrilled. Will be planting more this year.

  11. Standard bird baths are typically too deep for tiny hummingbirds. They are attracted to gently bubbling water on a flat surface (I made a bubbling fountain using large, flat stone slabs, a heavy duty plant saucer, a bucket set into a tall planter, and a pump). They also love misters, which are available online or in most garden centers. Google “bird bath ideas for hummingbirds” for photos and more ideas. Good luck!

  12. I tried to attract hummingbirds for years. Then I planted black and blue sage from burpees. They LOVED them!
    They are perennials where I live. I put them in planters outside my window. ❤️

  13. Here in South Florida, the hummingbirds are usually just passing through and feeders are a disappointment, so we concentrate more on butterflies. However, we have attracted a few hummers by planting fire bush and lipstick plant. We were surprised to find they like our red button ginger, with flower heads that look like pine ones (dozens per plant). There is usually one tender flower per cone, and the hummingbirds love them.

  14. We live in Edmonton Alberta, which is getting close to the most northern and western range of the Ruby Throated Hummingbird. I’ve been working for years to get some hummingbirds in my yard. This year I did a really big focus on it and was rewarded with 4 different Ruby Throats! (I also live in the middle of the city, so this was no small feat). The top 2 hands down were the Vermillionaire (which was also visited often by Tennessee Warblers who also drink nectar) and the Scarlet Runner Bean. My experiment next year will be to add Crocosmia from bulbs and I will wait impatiently for my young Trumpet Vine to finally be old enough to bloom.
    I added Arnold Red Honeysuckle, Dwarf Honeysuckle and Dropmore Scarlet all of which should finally bloom next year.

  15. Here in New York (Long Island). besides the trumpet vine. salvia, cardinal flower, monarda, zinnia, and native honeysuckle in our yard, they also love lantana, petunia, cosmos, fuchsia, native hibiscus (and also non-native rose of Sharon – which I didn’t plant but was already growing here). I also have morning glory and purple passionflower, but they’re in an area that I can’t see from the house. I have seen butterflies and bees feeding on these vines and am hoping the hummingbirds are utilizing them too. I recently planted a button bush but have to wait until it flowers to see if it lives up to its reputation as a hummingbird favorite, Native thistle is also supposed to be good. Hummingbirds also need to feed on insects, so avoid pesticides (and herbicides too). Besides planting native flora and providing water sources, maintaining a chemical-free yard is crucial for the health and well-being of all wildlife.

  16. Here in Calgary Alberta zone 3b (maybe 4a next to the house) the humming birds seem to enjoy the petunias more than the feeders I have hanging.

  17. Hi Carolyn,
    I have a birdbath right next to the feeder and wildflowers but they never use it. May I know what type of bird bath you have please

  18. I live in Northwestern Mississippi. The hummers here seem to like my daylilies, gladioli, coneflowers, petunias, garden phlox, and sage. However, they gather at the blooms of my hostas as if these are a delicacy rarely offered. I dislike those stalks looking wild and unkempt, but resist the urge to cut them for the hummingbirds. I have never noticed them looking for nectar at my rhododendrons, azaleas, or hydrangeas. I am planting some lilacs and drift roses soon; maybe they will check those out next year.

    Thanks for the article! I bookmarked it for future referencing.