3 Owl Species That Live in Ireland! (2022)

What types of owls can you see in Ireland?

Common Owls in Ireland

 

The above question is common, so I thought I’d help by making a list of all the individual owl species that live in Ireland.

 

The temptation to intersperse this entire article with puns is almost overwhelming. I could just wing it and beak-off about these birds all day long, but I really do give a hoot, and soon you would be talon me to stop it. Ok, settle down because that is owl you get. 🙂

 

Below is a list of all the owl species you can find in Ireland.

 


#1. Short-eared Owl

  • Asio flammeus

Types of Owls found in Ireland

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Adults typically range from 34 to 43 centimeters long with a wingspan of 85 to 103 centimeters.
  • Their coloring is mottled cream and dark brown, with lighter coloring under their wings.
  • This species has yellow eyes, a gray beak, and a defined facial disk.

 

This mid-sized tawny-brown mottled owl is widely distributed across Ireland. These birds mostly hunt in the daytime when voles, their favorite meal, are active. Interestingly, they are one of the most common owls you can see during daylight hours!

Short-eared Owls are typically found in open country. Your best chance to spot them in Ireland is at dusk or dawn in fields, grasslands, meadows, or even airports.

 

These owls build their nests on the ground in open areas. If obliged to flee its nest to draw off a threat, the parent will poop on the eggs so that the smell will keep predators away. Short-eared Owls also lure enemies away from their nest by hopping away and pretending to be crippled.

 

Short-eared Owls are not particularly vocal. But when they do make noises, these birds have a call, oddly enough, that sounds an awful lot like a cat looking for a mate. LISTEN BELOW!

 


#2. Long-eared Owl

  • Asio otus

Kinds of Owls in Ireland

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Adults typically range from 31 to 40 centimeters long with a wingspan of 86 to 102 centimeters.
  • The body is barred shades of brown and cream, with a gray and light brown face.
  • This species has bright orange eyes, a black beak, and long ear tufts, which is where it gets its name.

 

Long-eared Owls are also known as the Cat Owl because of their cat-like facial features. They are secretive and roost in very dense foliage. Combined with their excellent camouflage, these owls are tough to spot in Ireland!

As you can see, these owls get their name from the long tufts of feathers on their heads. These ear tufts resemble exclamation points, so Long-eared Owls often seem like they have a surprised look on their face.

 

Amongst owls, these guys are unique by being quite sociable. They are known to live in clusters and even share roosts!

 

Since Long-eared Owls can be incredibly hard to see, the best way to locate them is to listen! During the mating season, males are pretty talkative. Their typical call is repeated 10 to 200 times and sounds like a low “hoo,” evenly spaced every few seconds.

 


#3. Barn Owl

  • Tyto alba

common owls in the united states

Identifying Characteristics:

  • Adults typically range from 29 to 44 centimeters long with a wingspan of 1 to 1.25 meters.
  • The coloring is pale cream to white with dark wings. The belly is sometimes speckled dark down, and the wings are barred when in flight.
  • Its eyes are black, and the beak is pale gray. The facial disc is prominent, pale white, and outlined with dark brown.

 

Barn Owls (aka Church Owl, Ghost Owl, and Monkey-faced Owl) have a sandy-colored heart-shaped face with a dark brown edge. Interestingly, the shape of an owl’s face steers sound to their ears, which helps make them the most efficient hunter-by-sound ever tested. Their hearing is so good that they can quickly locate small animals under dense bush or snow, and they even hunt bats!

 

Barn Owls are non-migratory and found in Ireland year-round.

These nocturnal creatures tend to inhabit abandoned barns (hence the name). Farmers love them because they keep surrounding property fairly rodent-free, protecting other animals from the diseases that mice and rats carry.

 

They do not “hoot” in the classical fashion of other owls.

 

Their unique screechy sound is far more reminiscent of a hawk. When showing off for a female, males will sometimes clap their wings together a couple of times while flying.

 


Do you need additional help identifying owls in Ireland?

 

Here are a few books and resources you can purchase that will assist! (Links below take you to Amazon)

 


Which of these owls have you seen in Ireland?

 

Leave a comment below!

Leave a Reply